Japanese-American internment: Statesman-Journal web special


Looking for good sources on Japanese internment?

Editor & Publisher highlights the web version of a special series on Japanese internment during World War II, put together by the Statesman-Journal in Salem, Oregon. The series is featured in “Pauline’s Picks,” a feature by Pauline Millard showing off the best use of the web by old-line print publications.

Beyond Barbed Wire, photo by Salem Statesman-Journal

The Statesman-Journal’s web piece is “Beyond Barbed Wire,” featuring timelines, maps of the Tule Lake internment facility (closest to Oregon), stories about Japanese Americans in Oregon, especially in Salem, photos, video interviews, and a significant collection of original documents perfectly suited for document-based studies.

Texas kids test particularly badly in this part of U.S. history. Several districts ask U.S. history teachers and other social studies groups to shore up student knowledge in the area to overcome gaps pointed out in testing in the past three years, on the Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (TAKS). In teacher training, I’ve noted a lot of Texas social studies teachers are a bit shaky on the history.

The Korematsu decision was drummed into my conscious working on civil rights issues at the Senate Labor and Human Resources Committee, and complemented by Constitutional Law (thank you, Mary Cheh) and other courses I was taking at the same time at George Washington University. It helped that Utah has a significant Japanese population and had “hosted” one of the internment camps; one of my tasks was to be sure committee Chairman Orrin Hatch was up on issues and concerns when he met with Japanese descendants in his constituencies in Utah. Hatch was a cosponsor of the bills to study the internment, and then to apologize to Japanese Americans affected, and pay reparations.
The internment was also a sore spot with my father, G. Paul Darrell, who witnessed the rounding up of American citizens in California. Many of those arrested were his friends, business associates and acquaintances. Those events formed a standard against which he measured almost all other claims of civil rights violations.

Because children were imprisoned with their parents, because a lot of teenagers were imprisoned, this chunk of American history strikes particular sympathetic chords with students of any conscience.  Dorothea Lange’s having photographed some of the events and places, as well as Ansel Adams and others, also leaves a rich pictorial history.

(I found this thanks to the RSS feed of headlines from Editor & Publisher at the Scholars & Rogues site.)

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4 Responses to Japanese-American internment: Statesman-Journal web special

  1. onlycrook says:

    As usual, I’m far behind on reading your posts. I thought I’d add 3 links for Colorado’s Japanese Internment camp, Granada (and one for Governor Ralph Carr, our governor who spoke in favor of Japanese Americans at the cost of his political career).

    http://www.nps.gov/history/history/online_books/anthropology74/ce5j.htm

    This is the Granada chapter from an NPS book about the internment camps.

    Granada site: http://www.colorado.gov/dpa/doit/archives/wwcod/granada.htm

    Internment camp links: http://www.colorado.gov/dpa/doit/archives/wwcod/grlks.htm

    Ralph Carr biography: http://www.colorado.gov/dpa/doit/archives/govs/carr.html

    Like

  2. Wes Injerd says:

    Excellent source on Japanese internment here — much primary source material:

    http://home.comcast.net/~eo9066/Contents.html

    Like

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