Fixing personal history


You know how you think about things in history, about your view of things, and then come to realize that how you had been thinking about them, it couldn’t have happened that way?

I just came to the realization that my father couldn’t have been working on Liberty Ships during World War II, I don’t think.  He was north of Los Angeles, in the Bay Area during World War II.  His plumbing and pipefitting would have had to have been in the 1930s.

Who is left alive to tell?  Another case of “I wish he’d written it down,” and “I shoulda got the tape recorder and wired myself up to ask those questions.”

(Here’s where we discover my older siblings don’t read this blog, as we’ve suspected all along.)

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5 Responses to Fixing personal history

  1. heydave says:

    When I have to teach someone, an undergrad working for me or just a colleague who has to learn something I know, talking my way through it always comes off easier. But if I write it down and have to confine the process of learning to paper, whoa, I find out pretty clearly the difference between what I (think) I know and what is left unspoken in my head while talking.

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  2. Ed Darrell says:

    No, I’d probably never have questioned it. It makes perfect sense in the telling, but when I wrote it, the discrepancy glared from the reading.

    Sharpening of thought for most rational people comes not just from blogging. Writing of almost any sort helps. Think of the therapy and good records practice of “journaling.”

    Even better, to me: A good debate program. I learned more in intercollegiate debate than in almost all other courses combined. I learned more practical tools, too.

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  3. jd2718 says:

    Hmm. Would you have ever realized it if you hadn’t been blogging?

    Interesting. I am wondering now (since it has been foisted on me as a meme) how blogging has changed me. I wonder how much I’ve figured out as I’ve blogged.

    Jonathan

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  4. Ed Darrell says:

    World War II, yes. Many, if not most, built in Los Angeles. My father, on the other hand, was many miles north, in San Francisco.

    I’m looking for data to reconcile the stories.

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  5. heydave says:

    I’m confused: weren’t Liberty ships, or at least the large numbers of them, built during WWII? Are you saying they were all built on the east coast? I don’t see the timing contradiction.

    Sorry if I’m too slow today.

    Like

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