Colleague’s Fulbright-Hays trip to Senegal


One of my colleagues — an art teacher; you know, the adventurous type — heads off to Senegal this summer on a Fulbright-Hays program.

I’m sorta jealous, of course.  I need time to push our history course to championship level, though — I didn’t apply for anything this summer.

You can track Mr. Adkins’ trip and progress at a blog he’s set up, appropriately called Mr. Adkins’ Great Adventure in Senegal.

If you’re teaching world history, or art, or government, or environmental science, or geography, this might be a great blog to track.

Senegal is a very interesting place.  Note on the map how it completely surrounds its neighbor nation of The Gambia.

FAA map of Senegal

Senegal, map courtesy of the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA)

France held the nation as a colony once upon a time, from 1850 to independence of the Mali Federation in 1960 — one of the national languages is French, but regional languages are numerous, Wolof, Soninke, Seereer-Siin, Fula, Maninka, and Diola.  The Mali Federation was short-lived, and Senegal broke off in August of 1960.

If you listen to NPR, you’ve probably heard their reporter signing off in that distinct way she does, “Tthis is Ofeibea Quist-Arcton, for NPR, in Dah-KAHHH!”  (Not to be confused with Dacca, Pakistan).

According to the CIA Factbook (online version):

The French colonies of Senegal and the French Sudan were merged in 1959 and granted their independence as the Mali Federation in 1960. The union broke up after only a few months. Senegal joined with The Gambia to form the nominal confederation of Senegambia in 1982, but the envisaged integration of the two countries was never carried out, and the union was dissolved in 1989. The Movement of Democratic Forces in the Casamance (MFDC) has led a low-level separatist insurgency in southern Senegal since the 1980s, and several peace deals have failed to resolve the conflict. Nevertheless, Senegal remains one of the most stable democracies in Africa. Senegal was ruled by a Socialist Party for 40 years until current President Abdoulaye WADE was elected in 2000. He was reelected in February 2007, but has amended Senegal’s constitution over a dozen times to increase executive power and weaken the opposition, part of the President’s increasingly autocratic governing style. Senegal has a long history of participating in international peacekeeping and regional mediation.

The country is tropical, hot and humid.  Geographically, it is low, rolling plains.

Dakar is about as far west as one can go on the African continent.   (See the map inset — Senegal is in dark green).

Senegal has iron ores, and phosphorus (ancient bird droppings?).  It’s not a rich nation, but it’s better off than many developing countries.

Adkins is in for a great adventure, no?

Africa, showing Senegal - CIA Factbook

Africa, showing Senegal - CIA Factbook

About these ads

4 Responses to Colleague’s Fulbright-Hays trip to Senegal

  1. Arthur Hunt says:

    Hi Ed,

    Amy doesn’t go off to The Gambia until next January. The lead-up to the big adventure (shots, expenses, etc…) is too gruesome to document. If we figure out the internet/cell phone situation in that part of the world, then I hope that Amy will provide periodic updates. (Any readers who can give me some clues about these latter matters? I’m all ears.)

    We’ll see.

    Like

  2. Ed Darrell says:

    More on the big adventure in The Gambia, Art?  Sounds like fun.  Our oldest is off to Crete and probably eastern Europe.  It’s a good time to be young.

    Like

  3. Arthur Hunt says:

    Interesting, and almost coincidental. I’ll follow your blog, William, because my youngest will be spending a semester in The Gambia next year.

    Thanks for the pointer, Ed.

    Like

  4. William Adkins says:

    Great job Mr. Darrell. I hope to make my blog fun and interesting for students or anyone else you might log-in.

    Like

Play nice in the Bathtub -- splash no soap in anyone's eyes.

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 2,370 other followers

%d bloggers like this: