Texas Independence Day, March 2


Texans writing the Texas Declaration of Independence, 1836

In a meeting hall at Washington-on-the-Brazos, Texans meet to write the Texas Declaration of Independence, released March 2, 1836; image from Portal to Texas History

So, put some barbecue in the smoker, get a Shiner for you and your pet armadillo, sit back and enjoy the holiday.  If you’re near Washington-on-the-Brazos, go to the ceremony.  You’d better be sure you’ve got plenty of Blue Bell Ice Cream.

What?  You don’t get the day off?  You know, Texas schools don’t even take the day off any more.

I thought things were going to change when the Tea Party got to Austin and Washington?  What happened?

 

Original Manuscript, Texas Declaration of Independence - Texas State Library and Archives Commission

Original Manuscript, Texas Declaration of Independence - Texas State Library and Archives Commission

Text from the image above:

The Unanimous
Declaration of Independence
made by the
Delegates of the People of Texas
in General Convention
at the Town of Washington
on the 2nd day of March 1836

When a government has ceased
to protect the lives, liberty and property
of the people, from whom its legitimate
powers are derived, and for the advance-
ment of whose happiness it was inst-
ituted, and so far from being a guaran-
tee for the enjoyment of those inesti-
mable and inalienable rights, becomes
an instrument in the hands of evil
rulers for their oppression.

[Complete text, and images of each page, at the Texas State Library and Archives Commission site.]

Resources for Texas Independence Day

Resources at Millard Fillmore’s Bathtub

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3 Responses to Texas Independence Day, March 2

  1. Jim says:

    On a note completely unrelated to my tongue-in-cheek post, I wonder if your Texas readers are aware of just how prized your history is?

    For example, collectors of military uniform buttons will pay thousands of dollars for “Republic of Texas Naval” buttons…and possibly five figures for some of the rarer militia buttons, like “Republic of Texas Dragoons”.

    The Texas Navy buttons (manufactured in the north) are absolutely stunning…the die work and design is just exquisite.

    It sounds peculiar to us; this notion of a state having its own navy. But, of course, Texas was a nation before she was a state! I’ll have to track down some interesting photos and books for you.

    Like

  2. Ed Darrell says:

    Yes, it was. And yes, Perry is.

    Seriously.

    Like

  3. Jim says:

    Hello Ed!

    The Texas Declaration (which I had never read before — THANK YOU!) reads, in part,as follows…

    “When a government has ceased
    to protect the lives, liberty and property
    of the people, from whom its legitimate
    powers are derived, and for the advance-
    ment of whose happiness it was inst-
    ituted, and so far from being a guaran-
    tee for the enjoyment of those inesti-
    mable and inalienable rights…”

    Wow, Ed. Was your state founded by a bunch of bleeding heart, statist liberals? It sounds to me like they believed the state existed for something more than just the aggrandizement and rights of a wealthy few…but for an entire collective society. I hope Governor Perry is doing his part to drive a stake through the heart of such Socialistic notions.

    Jim

    (Who kids)

    Like

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