Now is the time for all good citizens to phone legislators for the sake of their country . . .


Ready to start dialing?  It’s time to dial to save your country.

MoveOn.org asks Texans to phone their U.S. senators for help:

Dear Ed,

Heads up: Congress is debating a budget plan that would be devastating to Texas. Will you pass this along?

Senators Kay Hutchison and John Cornyn need to hear from all of us about it right now, before they cut a deal in the next few days.

Please spread the word about all of these proposed cuts to Texas:

  • $98 million would be cut from federal funds for clean and safe water in Texas.1
  • 12,000 Texas children would be immediately cut from Head Start, which provides comprehensive early childhood development services for at-risk children ages zero to five.2
  • $391 million would be cut from Pell Grants, affecting all 664,000 higher education students with those grants in Texas.3
  • Job training and employment services would be effectively eliminated for 5,800 dislocated workers, 99,000 low-income adults, and 16,000 youths age 14 to 21.4
  • $10 million would be cut from law enforcement assistance, taking cops off the beat.5

It’s especially galling when the same budget protects tax breaks for corporations like GE and the very rich.

Just last night the news broke that Congress may be close to striking a deal on the budget. Now is the only time we can influence the outcome.

Can you call Sens. Hutchison and Cornyn and ask them to oppose these cuts in the budget? You can pick one of the cuts in this list to highlight in your call.

Senator Kay Hutchison
Phone: 202-224-5922

Senator John Cornyn
Phone: 202-224-2934

Click to report your call. Then pass this email along locally!

http://pol.moveon.org/call?tg=FSTX_1.FSTX_2&cp_id=1547&id=26722-5763840-yqXs_sx&t=2

The cuts that the Republicans are proposing would disproportionately hit those who can least afford it in Texas, and it’s up to us to stop them.

Thanks for all you do.

-Daniel, Amy, Milan, Tate, and the rest of the team

Sources:

1. “House Bill Means Fewer Children in Head Start, Less Help for Students to Attend College, Less Job Training, and Less Funding for Clean Water,” Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, March, 1, 2010
http://www.cbpp.org/cms/index.cfm?fa=view&id=3405

2. “Projected Reduction in Children Served in Head Start Based on H.R. 1—Fiscal Year 2011 Continuing Resolution,” Center for Law and Social Policy
http://www.moveon.org/r?r=207278&id=26722-5763840-yqXs_sx&t=3

3. “House Bill Means Fewer Children in Head Start, Less Help for Students to Attend College, Less Job Training, and Less Funding for Clean Water,” Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, March, 1, 2010
http://www.cbpp.org/cms/index.cfm?fa=view&id=3405

4. Ibid

5. Ibid

Want to support our work? We’re entirely funded by our 5 million members—no corporate contributions, no big checks from CEOs. And our tiny staff ensures that small contributions go a long way. Chip in here.

Meanwhile, the Texas House of Representatives scheduled the start of debate on H. 1 for Friday, April 1 — the budget resolution that would gut Texas schools and higher education, and set Texas on a course of decline that will make California’s troubles look serene by comparison.

NEA’s Texas affiliate, the Texas State Teachers’ Association, asks teachers to call their Texas representatives to weigh in against the drastic budget cuts (and you can call, too):

March 30, 2011

House Bill 1 is an assault on the public schools!

This Friday, April 1, the Texas House of Representatives is scheduled to begin debate on House Bill 1, its version of the state budget for 2012-2013. If this bill were to become law in its present form, it would cut almost $8 billion from public education and, with it, tens of thousands of school district jobs.

Unfortunately, this is no April Fool’s joke.

It is, instead, the proposal of a state leadership that would rather plug a huge hole in the state budget by firing teachers, packing kids into overcrowded classrooms and closing neighborhood schools than by adequately investing in our state’s future.

NOW is the time to call your legislator and let him or her know what these budget cuts will mean in your classroom, your school and your community. We must stop House Bill 1, and your call is critical!

To contact your state representative, call 800-260-5444, and we will connect you [That’s the number for TSTA members, but try it — I’ll bet they’ll accept your help!]. You can call any time, day or night, but you need to call before Friday. Leaving a voice message with your representative’s office is just as good as talking to a staff member.

It is important to include the following points in your conversation or message:

  • Your name, that you are a TSTA member and that you live and vote in their district.
  • An overwhelming number of people in your community – parents, teachers and other taxpayers – oppose cuts that would harm public schools.
  • Your own story, how laying off educators, cramming children into crowded classrooms and closing neighborhood schools would have a harmful impact on your students and community.
  • Ask your representative to find the revenue necessary to avoid harmful budget cuts, restore full education funding and end this assault on our public schools.

This will take only a few minutes of your time, and it will be time well spent. Your representative needs to hear from you before Friday!

Pick up your telephone and strike a blow for freedom, democracy, education and sanity in government.

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22 Responses to Now is the time for all good citizens to phone legislators for the sake of their country . . .

  1. Nick K says:

    Come on, Morgan, lets see you defend this:

    – BANK OF AMERICA: In 2009, Bank of America didn’t pay a single penny in federal income taxes, exploiting the tax code so as to avoid paying its fair share. “Oh, yeah, this happens all the time,” said Robert Willens, a tax accounting expert interviewed by McClatchy. “If you go out and try to make money and you don’t do it, why should the government pay you for your losses?” asked Bob McIntyre of Citizens for Tax Justice. The same year, the mega-bank’s top executives received pay “ranging from $6 million to nearly $30 million.”

    – BOEING: Despite receiving billions of dollars from the federal government every single year in taxpayer subsidies from the U.S. government, Boeing didn’t “pay a dime of U.S. federal corporate income taxes” between 2008 and 2010.

    – CITIGROUP: Citigroup’s deferred income taxes for the third quarter of 2010 amounted to a grand total of $0.00. At the same time, Citigroup has continued to pay its staff lavishly. “John Havens, the head of Citigroup’s investment bank, is expected to be the bank’s highest paid executive for the second year in a row, with a compensation package worth $9.5 million.”

    – EXXON-MOBIL: The oil giant uses offshore subsidiaries in the Caribbean to avoid paying taxes in the United States. Although Exxon-Mobil paid $15 billion in taxes in 2009, not a penny of those taxes went to the American Treasury. This was the same year that the company overtook Wal-Mart in the Fortune 500. Meanwhile the total compensation of Exxon-Mobil’s CEO the same year was over $29,000,000.

    – GENERAL ELECTRIC: In 2009, General Electric — the world’s largest corporation — filed more than 7,000 tax returns and still paid nothing to U.S. government. They managed to do this by a tax code that essentially subsidizes companies for losing profits and allows them to set up tax havens overseas. That same year GE CEO Jeffery Immelt — who recently scored a spot on a White House economic advisory board — “earned total compensation of $9.89 million.” In 2002, Immelt displayed his lack of economic patriotism, saying, “When I am talking to GE managers, I talk China, China, China, China, China….I am a nut on China. Outsourcing from China is going to grow to 5 billion.”

    – WELLS FARGO: Despite being the fourth largest bank in the country, Wells Fargo was able to escape paying federal taxes by writing all of its losses off after its acquisition of Wachovia. Yet in 2009 the chief executive of Wells Fargo also saw his compensation “more than double” as he earned “a salary of $5.6 million paid in cash and stock and stock awards of more than $13 million.”

    http://thinkprogress.org/2011/02/26/main-street-tax-cheats/

    Lets see you explain why you should pay taxes and they shouldn’t. Lets see you explain why the mom&pop store down the street from you should pay taxes and these companies and people shouldn’t.

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  2. Ed Darrell says:

    Morgan, what do you think about the distinction Justice Holmes drew between taxes we pay to make civilization work, and penalties. A false dichotomy, may I presume you’d say?

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  3. Nick K says:

    Jim writes:
    by selling advertising (billboards on hospital walls, ads in industry publications) and by offering medicines at a “reasonable” markup.

    Right…just as it was a “reasonable markup” when one of the pharm companies raised the price on a drug used to stabilize the birth of preemies by roughly 2000%.

    I love how “conservatives” like Morgan all just love to say the United States is the “greatest country on the planet” but they want to destroy everything that made it that way.

    Oh and Morgan, if you think noone should pay more taxes then they want to then me, Jim, Ed and whoever else will be expecting you to pay us back for all our taxes that went to benefit your ungrateful ass. And since you and your fellow right wingers wanted the Iraq and Afghanistan wars so much you can pay for those yourselves. Oh and also you can pay for Bush’s tax cuts as well.

    So let us know when you set up an account on Paypal and are willing to pay us back.

    Don’t play games you simply don’t have the intelligence to win, Morgan.

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  4. Jim says:

    I actually participated in an online forum with a Libertarian who suggested we provide all services as follows…

    1. National Defense, police and possibly fire services to be paid for with donations from individuals and corporations. He suggested an annual telethon be part of this.

    2. Medicare, Medicaid, EMT/Ambulance services and other healthcare services to be entirely privatized and placed in the hands of the highest bidder. He reasoned that this was likely to be pharmaceutical concerns or insurance companies. They would, he opined, recoup their investment and then some by selling advertising (billboards on hospital walls, ads in industry publications) and by offering medicines at a “reasonable” markup.

    3. National Parks, Preserves, Forests and historic sites would be returned to the states for privatization. The states could sell them to developers who would “make the most” of the particular locations. It would be a win-win…because the states would reap a bundle of cash from the sale and the developers would make hefty profits by “improving” places like Yellowstone, Gettysburg, and the Alaska National Wildlife Refuge. In some cases, the improvements would attract tourist dollars. In others, the developers would make money by de-foresting, drilling or otherwise exploiting the land for profit.

    He had many more ideas, none of which where in the American spirit.

    This is life on Planet Tea Party, ladies and gentlemen. Only dumbs fail to see past the end of their noses to the logical consequences of such short-sightedness.

    The unfortunate reality, however, is that there is no small number of dumbs holding public office and pulling levers in elections.

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  5. Nick K says:

    Morgan writes:
    But Ed won’t follow my advice. MoveOn wouldn’t accept the idea, if he did. This makes me very, very happy. They’ll continue with bullying legislators, to force money out of the business owners…you know how the song goes, tax the rich, feed the poor, ’til there ain’t no rich no more. THEN what do you do?? You just got rid of all the rich people, moron!

    *yawns* and yet there were rich people in this country when the taxes on them were 90%. And yet if you think their taxes are raised to, say, 45% the rich will all disappear?

    Tell us, Morgan. Is it meth you’re ingesting to come up with that fantasy? Or just plain cocaine?

    Exactly how do you think this country is going to continue to be the “greatest country on the planet” if you’re not paying a damn thing? Exactly how do you think its fair that the rich and businesses get to skate on paying their taxes so that you have to make up the difference?

    Or did that not occur to you? That the less taxes they pay the more taxes you have to pay.

    Since you keep on harping that one suggestion then I have one for you. If you want to live in a place where you pay no or a minimal of taxes then why don’t you move to Somalia? or Afghanistan? Or Pakistan?
    Or any of the other taxless hellholes around the world?

    If you’re not willing to do that then you’re in no position to crow that those who want to raises taxes on the rich should just voluntarily pay more.

    Let us know when you’re moving out of the country so you can put your principles to the test, Morgan.

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  6. Here in Germany it’s mainly the same. People mourn and mourn because the streets slowly start to literally fade away but as soon as the government plans to raise taxes they all start to cry… at the end of the day it doesn’t make a difference if you pay more for the same or pay the same and get less you know^^

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  7. Ed Darrell says:

    But Ed won’t follow my advice. MoveOn wouldn’t accept the idea, if he did. This makes me very, very happy. They’ll continue with bullying legislators, to force money out of the business owners…you know how the song goes, tax the rich, feed the poor, ’til there ain’t no rich no more. THEN what do you do?? You just got rid of all the rich people, moron!

    Governments shouldn’t run vital programs with bake sale proceeds. We can’t run the defense of our nation that way (which is why we scrapped the Articles of Confederation, by the way), and education is more important than defense, in the long run, and to defense.

    I don’t suggest we turn government into a charity because that’s a dumb idea. Misanthropes, and even some well-meaning people, would screw it up.

    We tried that once in America, and it didn’t work. So we created the Constitution, instead.

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  8. Ed Darrell says:

    I’m ignoring it Flakey because it’s irrelevant. Were you paying attention when Ed quoted from the entire boilerplate propaganda leaflet?

    Nice to know you think the facts come from a leaflet. That way, I’m pretty sure you didn’t read what I wrote. No leaflet.

    There isn’t a single word in there about kicking in anything.

    Like I said, I kick in every day. IRS recognizes that teachers do this. There is a pittance allowed against income on the 1040, for teachers. We’ve institutionalized underfunding schools so much that it’s in the tax code now.

    Not a single word about running this past the voters.

    I pointed out that the cuts in budgets were not run past taxpayers — if that’s your criterion, you should be madder than hell. Rick Perry said no cuts would be necessary. He told a $27 billion lie (the same size as all of Georgia’s budget.)

    Taxpayers didn’t vote for cuts in Texas, nor in most other places.

    And they’ve made that quite clear. In Wisconsin now, about 60% of taxpayers and voters oppose the cuts Gov. Ahab Walker proposes.

    What’s the point of “running it past voters” if you just act like Robespierre still in charge, anyway?

    Are you arguing that voters agree with the cuts, Morgan? I can’t find any poll that says that. Especially that’s not true here in Texas.

    Whatever happened to letting our democratic institutions work?

    Just hey…let’s blitz the legislators, let them know “we” want them to “find” some money to fund these programs. Go find it, you legislators!

    Texas has a “rainy day fund” of more than $9 billion which would more than cover all the education cuts. Gov. Perry says we shouldn’t touch it.

    The money is there. The question is, should we kill off Texas education, or improve it? Gov. Perry says “kill it.” Morgan agrees.

    Jefferson and Washington warned us there would be reprobates like you guys. Lincoln tried to work around ‘em with the Morrell Act.

    Which means raise taxes on the people who are high enough up on the income pyramid, that they’ll always be in a numerical minority.

    I said nothing like that. As I’ve pointed out, we have the money in the bank here in Texas. As I and others have pointed out, the budget shortfall was an intentional giveaway of tax money on the part of Rick Perry, years ago.

    It’s not fair to take money from poor people and the middle class — the biggest taxpayers in Texas — and give it to the rich, and then turn around and kill education programs.

    It’s also really, really stupid.

    So, Morgan, why don’t you want to run your plan past the voters? We did, and they disapproved it. Why don’t you want to have our legislators listen to their constituents? The people of Texas almost unanimously oppose the cuts. Why do you favor ignoring the will of the people?

    What is it you have against education? Was Miss Grundy really that mean to you in third grade?

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  9. I’m ignoring it Flakey because it’s irrelevant. Were you paying attention when Ed quoted from the entire boilerplate propaganda leaflet? There isn’t a single word in there about kicking in anything. Not a single word about running this past the voters. Just hey…let’s blitz the legislators, let them know “we” want them to “find” some money to fund these programs. Go find it, you legislators! Which means raise taxes on the people who are high enough up on the income pyramid, that they’ll always be in a numerical minority.

    Everyone who’s paid any attention at all knows how this works. The taxes get raised as long as raising taxes nets votes…so these rich people Nick hates so much, leave. Or if they stay put, they shut down their businesses. Or refuse to expand them since it no longer makes business sense to do so.

    But I’m not trying to convince you or anybody. You aren’t trying to convince me…or at least, you shouldn’t.

    I’m just trying to get a feel for how obstinate the leftists truly are, and I’m liking what I’m seeing. See, the rich people in Texas don’t have the numbers to re-elect Rick Perry. But it happened. That isn’t middle-class, lower-income voters who listen to Rush Limbaugh too often and get programmed. You know what that is? That’s people looking for work, and getting sick & tired of not finding it.

    MoveOnDotOrg’s solution? C’mon all you fellow leftists, let’s bury the legislators in letters…try to convince them that you, and we, represent all of Texas. Pressure them to really put the screws on those rich people. And don’t let those voters have anything to say about it whatever you do! They might go for those lower-taxes nonsense, and you see from Ed’s comments how much enthusiasm The Left has for this.

    Well, Ed’s personally invested in this fund that a lot of his fellow Texans don’t think is such a good idea…bully for him. Really, he deserves credit for putting his money where his mouth is. He should encourage MoveOn to follow his lead, and change their campaign to one of “we’re here with our cash trying to solve the problem…where are YOU?” That would be persuasive. That would convince the moderate Texan voter.

    But Ed won’t follow my advice. MoveOn wouldn’t accept the idea, if he did. This makes me very, very happy. They’ll continue with bullying legislators, to force money out of the business owners…you know how the song goes, tax the rich, feed the poor, ’til there ain’t no rich no more. THEN what do you do?? You just got rid of all the rich people, moron!

    But nobody on The Left is open to doing it any different. Now pardon me, I’m off to go threaten some Republican campaign commercial producers. The way I figure it, they need to make the most out of this or else they’re in the wrong line of work.

    Conservatism = market = choice, “liberalism” = government rules & taxes = force and coercion. Within modern times, this is remaining a constant. There’s gotta be a way to fit that onto a bumper sticker. Pretty simple concept.

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  10. Flakey says:

    Now Morgan is lying, and trolling. Not worth really trying to reply to him any more.

    Or is it Morgan you have trouble reading what Ed said in his last post. About using $2,000 of his own money in school the last 7 months?

    Like

  11. Okay, don’t listen to me. I’m happy.

    The people who decide elections and don’t give a rip about party labels, are trying to figure out if it’s true what conservatives say about liberals. “He’s a guy so nice he’ll give you the shirt off somebody else’s back.” So I’m glad to see this reaction. They can stop wondering. I approached you about the idea of working through voluntary donations…with a message of “we’re leading the way, let’s all step up and address the problem” rather than “take more money from that guy over there whether he wants to give it or not, and to hell with what the voters say about it.”

    Apparently, if all of The Left is like you two, they’ll have none of it. They want to use force, through taxes, rather than voluntary efforts through contributions. And then, going by Ed’s words, when they’re done exerting this force they’ll want to call the other side “totalitarian.”

    I’m liking what I see here. The 2012 elections are already decided.

    Like

  12. Nick K says:

    Morgan, GE pays nothing in federal taxes. Nothing. In fact according to them the government owes them $3 billion dollars. GE just had a $15 billion dollar profit for last year.

    And yet they’re demanding that their union workers make huge concessions.

    And you have no problem with this?

    Your precious Republicans said 10 years ago that cutting taxes on the rich would lead to prosperity for everyone and the government would still bring in more money then it was.

    Did that happen? Where’s the prosperity for everyone, Morgan?

    What has to happen, Morgan, for you to realize that your sides’ position simply and bluntly doesn’t work and makes the economic situation we’re in that much worse?

    What? You have to lose your job? Your house? Your family? What has to happen for you to realize that your best interests are not represented by the Republicans..they only care about the rich and the wealthy. And you, Morgan, will never ever in your life be one of them. And neither will your kids.

    So why support a position and a party that doesn’t give a damn whether you or your kids live or die?

    The rich used to be taxed at 90% and yet the country survived, the rich got richer, the middle class got richer, the poor got richer. But now the rich get taxed at less then a third of that and the country is foundering and the only ones being asked to sacrifice, Morgan, are you, me, Ed, Jim and the rest of the middle class and the poor.

    Name one sacrifice the Republicans have demanded of the rich, Morgan?

    Like

  13. Ed Darrell says:

    You know, Morgan, you don’t have a leg to stand on. I’ve blown way past $2,000 contributed to the public schools just in the past 7 months. I fill that damned envelope every day. The property tax savings were not asked for, and polls show a majority of Americans, and a plurality of Texans, would prefer tax hikes to budget cuts.

    It’s one more indication that totalitarianism is almost inevitable from the right-wing. There is no demand for tax cuts, there is great demand for better schools — so the legislature gives tax cuts and slashes schools.

    President Reagan’s Commission on Excellence in Education said something that applies to the Texas legislature, and to the Republican-controlled House of Representatives in spades:

    If an unfriendly foreign power had attempted to impose on America the mediocre educational performance that exists today, we might well have viewed it as an act of war. As it stands, we have allowed this to happen to ourselves. We have even squandered the gains in student achievement made in the wake of the Sputnik challenge. Moreover, we have dismantled essential support systems which helped make those gains possible. We have, in effect, been committing an act of unthinking, unilateral educational disarmament.

    Our society and its educational institutions seem to have lost sight of the basic purposes of schooling, and of the high expectations and disciplined effort needed to attain them. This report, the result of 18 months of study, seeks to generate reform of our educational system in fundamental ways and to renew the Nation’s commitment to schools and colleges of high quality throughout the length and breadth of our land.

    Reagan spoke of making America “a shining city on a hill.” Alas, the conservatives are talking about making America a stinking shit from a shill. How far have the mighty fallen!

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  14. I’m just letting you know honestly, Ed. And it pleases me to know you’re going to find ways to ignore this, as I knew you would. Had I not enjoyed some reassurance you’d ignore it, I never would have given you the idea.

    What I’m letting you know is — if I were a Texas legislator, even one elected under the banner of the democrat party…oh, just got with it, okay…when my mailroom is filled up with bushels and bushels of letters from MoveOn and the people they signed on to this letter-writing campaign…readers of Millard Fillmore’s bathtub…registered voters of Texas who receive literature from the state democrat party…and then my mailroom staff proceeds to tell me there isn’t a single nickel of money in those envelopes? That it’s all a bunch of boilerplate about “please tax that other guy over there.”

    How impressive do you think this is going to be? Seriously? A bunch of democrats in Texas want some other guy to get taxed more. Well DUH. They’re democrats! That’s practically the definition.

    The moderate voter, in Texas as well as in the nation, is the one who decides elections. And the moderate voter isn’t firmly in my camp…he thinks you might be sincere, that you’re concerned about the deficit, and so forth. But he isn’t firmly in your camp either. He thinks people like me just might have a point, that democrats are really all about routing public funds to their friends, more corrupt than any Republican there ever was, and don’t give a damn about the solvency of the treasury. They’re undecided about this. And by the way, they just got done re-electing Perry.

    I’m just pointing out the obvious. If you’re serious about this campaign, about convincing people, and going through the electorate rather than bypassing them — it would be much more persuasive to kick in some money, rather than more demands to soak up the money from some rich “other” guy.

    By the way, your boilerplate turn-around doesn’t work in this case. I’m not organizing a grassroots effort, and you are. You need a bigger tool chest for these kinds of discussions.

    Like

  15. Ed Darrell says:

    But, Morgan, Why not use the situation as an opportunity, and deal a little bit of damage to the timeless right-wing stereotype? The immediate crisis is that your state coffers are dry because the tax rates are too low, or running dry because huge tax breaks went to rich people. You want to agitate a grassroots movement to get that fixed. How does that not naturally lead to personal checks being put into envelopes? How come it’s always this whine about going broke, when we’re not, or the whine about oppressive taxes, when the problem is oppressive profit-taking by the rich from taxes paid by the little guys?

    Raise my taxes. I didn’t need the $200 reduction in property taxes, and for $200, I’d gladly vote to save Texas schools.

    I did vote that way, in fact. My representatives know it. My Congressional people, on the other hand, have given up answering me. I answer them back, and they duck.

    Robin Hood was a bandit, but a well-loved bandit because he dispensed justice.

    Teachers are closer to Robin Hood than to King John, and the Republicans know it.

    Like

  16. Yes, I subscribe to your feed and I’m well aware of this controversy. Conservatives and liberals just keep slinging barbs at each other, and both sides have some justification since both sides are showing a rather choosey fair-weather friendship to the urgency factor about deficits. On the national level, as well as in the State of California, we’ve seen when it comes to spending of money our liberals can be counted on to suddenly not care about fiscal solvency one bit. Every day is Christmas when you hold the public’s purse strings.

    But that’s an endless debate, as long as each side is privileged to present only the evidence it wants to present, rather than the whole picture.

    My point is a little bit more focused: Why not use the situation as an opportunity, and deal a little bit of damage to the timeless left-wing stereotype? The immediate crisis is that your state coffers are dry, or running dry. You want to agitate a grassroots movement to get that fixed. How does that not naturally lead to personal checks being put into envelopes? How come it’s always this three-party maneuver; “don’t tax you don’t tax me, tax that guy behind the tree”?

    It looks kind of like a light you can’t switch off.

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  17. Ed Darrell says:

    Morgan, six years ago in Texas we made a deal: Property taxes were reduced, in a regressive fashion (much larger reductions for rich people with lots of property) with the money to be made up by taxes on businesses. That the business groups sorta went along should have been a clue.

    New and higher business taxes didn’t actually materialize. Rather than go back to the earlier property tax levels, George Bush and Rick Perry just kept kicking that ball down the road.

    As recently as five months ago Rick Perry promised that Texas had no deficit problem, and in fact had a surplus, so no cuts would be necessary.

    We do have a choice in Texas, and I think we should raise taxes to keep from having a deadbeat government.

    Like

  18. Ed Darrell says:

    We were more massively in debt in 1946 that we are now. Despite that crushing debt, the U.S. decided that increasing spending on education, especially for the GI Bill, in science, and for junior high and high schools, was the way to go. That spending set our nation up for 50 years of economic boom (with a few recessions along the way).

    Despite our debt in 1946, our nation decided that it was more important to rebuild Germany, Japan and Italy — our enemies in the war we had just fought — and our allies, in order to avoid the errors of World War I, in order to create the prosperity that promotes peace and prevents war.

    So, you claim we are too poor now to build an American university in Cairo and Alexandria to build Egypt’s entrepreneurial population, to build Egypt’s economy? You claim we are too poor to do for the Iraq and Afghanistan veterans what we did for the World War II and Korea veterans?

    I do not believe, as you appear to, that the U.S. no longer has the spirit, spunk and money to be successful, to wage peace, and to expand the world’s economy and horizons.

    I have seen states cut budgets, however, and every one of them has come to regret it. California coasted for nearly two decades after Prop 13, but has run into the ditch since then. Texas should not hasten to follow California into the ditch.

    Incidentally, during those times of “being broke” but doing the right thing, America’s biggest earners and wealthiest people paid tax at ten times the rate of less-well-off working people. Our hightest tax brackets ran 90% of income. Patriots paid them, many without complaining too much.

    Heck, even John Lennon and Paul McCartney complained about Britain’s tax rates, but put out two albums in a month to benefit England’s treasury. You can’t be as patriotic to the U.S. as John Lennon was to Britain?

    Like

  19. Jim says:

    Precisely correct, Michael.

    And Morgan, I actually *do* send in more than I am supposed to for precisely this reason: Americans — particularly those in my higher tax bracket — are UNDERtaxed. I am grateful for all that this precious country has done for me. One of the reasons my wife and I have prospered is because America has been so good go us. So we cheerfully pay our taxes and more.

    We believe we should be taxed at about 70 percent. At that rate, America is a steal for us…since this great nation has given 100% for us time and time again. We find it tragic that people such as yourself consider it burdensome that President Obama wants to increase the tax rate (only on the fabulously wealthy, too) from 34% to 38%. For all our country, our troops, our flag and our founders have done for us? Paying more taxes is the LEAST we can do.

    I know you feel the same surge of patriotic fervor I feel, Morgan. I know you love America, too. How do YOU pay back your country for all the blessings it has given you?

    Like

  20. Texas recently cut taxes when it could not afford to do so. Reinstating them or replacing them is obviously necessary.

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  21. Here’s the answer: If you feel passions about this and want to follow up, make those phone calls, pledge an amount, and send in a check.

    And then send an e-mail back to MoveOn, chastising them for the fact that this was not part of the original request. This is why liberals catch it from all sides, is it not? “Nice enough to give you the shirt off some other guy’s back” or some such? How about fight the stereotype, this one time, now that the situation is right for it?

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  22. I understand and feel your pain but the country is massively in debt. The only ways to get out of debt are to cut spending or to raise revenue (taxes).

    People seem unwilling to accept tax increases so cuts are the only option you have. Do you have any specific suggestions on what you would like to see cut?

    Like

Play nice in the Bathtub -- splash no soap in anyone's eyes.

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