Happy 142nd birthday, Yellowstone National Park!


142 years ago today, @YellowstoneNPS became America's first national park. RT to wish them a very happy birthday! pic.twitter.com/drka6iq0Tc

Tweet from the Department of Interior: 142 years ago today, @YellowstoneNPS became America’s first national park. RT to wish them a very happy birthday! pic.twitter.com/drka6iq0Tc

Ken Burns called the National Parks probably the best idea America has had.

Certainly a great idea — really born on this day, 142 years ago, with the designation of Yellowstone National Park.

Yellowstone NP contains the world’s largest collection of geysers. It is the heart of the largest, nearly-intact temperate zone ecosystem on Earth as well, contained in 3,468 square miles (8,983 km²), a laboratory and playground for geologists, geographers, botanists, zoologists, and almost anyone else who loves the nature and the wild.

Only 142 years old?  In the U.S., we have more than 300 units in the National Park System, now, including National Historic Places as well as the best of the wild.  Around the world, how much land has been saved, for the benefit of humanity, by this idea?  Not enough.

What’s your favorite memory of Yellowstone? What’s your favorite feature?

More:

Great Fountain Geyser in Yellowstone, the first U.S. national park, erupts every 9 to 15 hours, shooting water up to 220 feet high.  Photograph by Michael Melford

From National Geographic: Great Fountain Geyser in Yellowstone, the first U.S. national park, erupts every 9 to 15 hours, shooting water up to 220 feet high. Photograph by Michael Melford

About these ads

3 Responses to Happy 142nd birthday, Yellowstone National Park!

  1. Ed Darrell says:

    Thinking on your comment, BF, I cannot think of a single occasion in which the “highly rich neighbors” of any National Park did not complain about the park designation. Yellowstone produced little opposition because that corner of Wyoming had not been settled yet. It was wilderness.

    But Grand Canyon, Yosemite, Zion, Bryce, Arches, Canyonlands, Gates of the Arctic, Rocky Mountain . . . everyone I can think of produced opposition from the rich neighbors, who often had use of the land without cost, or who had designs on destructive exploitation of the resources.

    Got a counter example?

    Like

  2. Ed Darrell says:

    When designated, the land was federal land already; there were no “highly rich” neighbors, unless you count the Native Americans of the area — see first link in the story.

    Like

  3. Black Flag® says:

    It is not a great idea.
    It was a Federal theft of land to protect adjacent land of the highly rich who did not want neighbors – you – to live there.

    It is beautiful, though.

    Like

Play nice in the Bathtub -- splash no soap in anyone's eyes.

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 2,370 other followers

%d bloggers like this: