Spam fight continues, with new spammers


It’s called “negative SEO,” the ad agent for a California law firm tells me.

When someone gets a decent presence in blog mentions and other placements of ads on-line, competitors take a legitimate phrase, or a few phrases, from those ads, and they start spamming sites with them.  Google then notices a blip in traffic, and tells the original advertiser to stop it or Google will ban them from search engines.  Of course, the advertiser doesn’t know who is doing the spamming . . .

The law firm and fancy car dealer seem to have gotten it under control, and I had hoped that would be the end of it.

But the Kia dealer near St. Louis is showing up again — and for some odd reason, an air conditioner service group in Tucson, Arizona.  In the past day I’ve got about thousand spam messages on the blog, more than 600 offering air conditioner service.

One might wish these spam hits would boost the traffic numbers on the blog -- but they don't count.  Blog spam filters are smart enough not to count these as hits, but not wily enough to figure out how to stop them.  604 messages like this.  Rats.

One might wish these spam hits would boost the traffic numbers on the blog — but they don’t count. Blog spam filters are smart enough not to count these as hits, but not wily enough to figure out how to stop them. 604 messages like this. Rats.

My apologies, Dear Reader.  If you posted a comment and it didn’t show up, send me an e-mail, or post another comment without links, and I’ll try to rescue it.

About these ads

2 Responses to Spam fight continues, with new spammers

  1. Ed Darrell says:

    When I started out, I had several people comment that their comments didn’t appear. Usually angrily.

    Then I discovered the spam filters, and that they were posting things that triggered the filters.

    Generally, the stuff the spam filters catch is spam. But this is a low-traffic blog (sadly, now); some commenters like Black Flag have a tendency to say things that trigger the filters I’ve set on profanity, but it’s easily fixable; and some, like Black Flag, seem to post from ip addresses that the Akismet software finds likely to be spam anyway. For every 300 good spam catches, I get one false positive that I’d like to have as a comment.

    If I get 300 spam comments every four days, it’s no problem. When I get 2,000 a day, it’s a burden.

    Like

  2. I never check to see what my spam filter is blocking. Maybe I should!

    Like

Please play nice in the Bathtub -- splash no soap in anyone's eyes.

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 2,478 other followers

%d bloggers like this: