Kerouac played fantasy baseball – four decades early


Who knew?

Three of Jack Kerouac’s fantasy baseball team cards, circa 1953-56. New York Public Library, Berg Collection, Jack Kerouac Archive

Three of Jack Kerouac’s fantasy baseball team cards, circa 1953-56. New York Public Library, Berg Collection, Jack Kerouac Archive

Kerouac fans, and anyone who participates in a rotisserie league sport, and anyone who just wants a moment of merriment, should read this New York Times story:

Almost all his life Jack Kerouac had a hobby that even close friends and fellow Beats like Allen Ginsberg and William S. Burroughs never knew about. He obsessively played a fantasy baseball game of his own invention, charting the exploits of made-up players like Wino Love, Warby Pepper, Heinie Twiett, Phegus Cody and Zagg Parker, who toiled on imaginary teams named either for cars (the Pittsburgh Plymouths and New York Chevvies, for example) or for colors (the Boston Grays and Cincinnati Blacks).

At least one more book Kerouac had inside, unwritten.  Now we just see the outline of what could have been a superb, and funny, work of fiction, in a book by New York Public Library curator Isaac Gewirtz.  The Kerouac items are in the Berg Collection at the Library.

No historian could make this stuff up.

One Response to Kerouac played fantasy baseball – four decades early

  1. […] The Millard Fillmore’s Bathtub blog recalled the version of fantasy baseball author Jack Kerouac used to play. I thought is was fascinating, but then again I’m a sucker for Kerouac. If you are too check it out here. […]

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