New blog from the Texas Historical Commission

June 8, 2009

Texas Parlor notes that the Texas Historical Commission has gotten into the blog business, with a blog called See the Sites.

New logo and slogan for the Texas Historical Commission

New logo and slogan for the Texas Historical Commission

A lot of photos from the sites the Historical Commission operates, news of special events, and links to the Commission’s sites’ websites.  As yet there are not any substantive historical analyses.

The new blog accompanies a redesign of the Texas Historical Commission’s website, and the creation of a new logo for the agency, with a new slogan.

The new website makes navigation a good bit easier, to get to information about cemeteries, or the LaSalle Projects, Texas’s remarkable collection of county courthouses, Civil War monuments, or any of a number of other categories.

Historians begin to make the internet a real tool for education and learning, and the practice of history recording.

Tip of the old scrub brush to Will’s Texas Parlor, a site every Texas history teacher should have bookmarked, and should visit often.


Moab’s uranium tailings, still “going to be moved”

June 8, 2009

Has this news story changed at all in the last 30 years?

You may remember last March when last the Bathtub visited the issue of uranium tailings near Moab, Utah — “soon” to be moved in a multi-million dollar project.

Still pending — but with more money! At this rate, by 2050, this project will have enough money to buy Utah and force all the residents out.  Then the tailings may not need so urgently to be moved.

(Actually, if you read the article at Planetsave, it says the tailings are being moved.  Good news.)

Cool picture, though:

Caption from Planetsave:  Desert spreads endlessly beyond the horizon, where crystalline azure meets rusted bronze. This is red rock country. Moab, Utah is known for its breathtaking scenery. Red rock arches, labyrinth-like canyons, the clever Colorado River. This paradise permeates the soul and the soil.  But something else sleeps in the soil: uranium tailings.

Caption from Planetsave: Desert spreads endlessly beyond the horizon, where crystalline azure meets rusted bronze. This is red rock country. Moab, Utah is known for its breathtaking scenery. Red rock arches, labyrinth-like canyons, the clever Colorado River. This paradise permeates the soul and the soil. But something else sleeps in the soil: uranium tailings.


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