Fight the flu: Posters and blog buttons

September 12, 2009

Cover your nose with a tissue when you sneeze or cough. Visit www.cdc.gov/h1n1 for more information.Click on the graphic for more information.

Add to FacebookAdd to NewsvineAdd to DiggAdd to Del.icio.usAdd to StumbleuponAdd to RedditAdd to BlinklistAdd to TwitterAdd to TechnoratiAdd to Furl

Advertisements

Products of intelligent design

September 12, 2009

Polychaete worm, 4-foot long version.  A product of intelligent design?

Polychaete worm, 4-foot long version. A product of intelligent design?

Fish and coral-eating polychaete worms can cause destruction in otherwise peaceful fish tanks.  Read about it here.

Fish tongue-eating isopod parasite.  Image from Pharyngula, borrowed from someone else

Fish tongue-eating isopod parasite. Image from Pharyngula, borrowed from someone else

Read about that one here.

Does William Dembski really explain these things with his maths?  What was God thinking then?

Tip of the old scrub brush and a shake of the old lobster trap to Pharyngula.

Share the word:

Add to FacebookAdd to NewsvineAdd to DiggAdd to Del.icio.usAdd to StumbleuponAdd to RedditAdd to BlinklistAdd to TwitterAdd to TechnoratiAdd to Furl


Rasberry Crazy Ants – where’s Godzilla when you need him?

September 12, 2009

Texas holds more than its share of nasty pests:  Imported Argentine Fire Ants, Canadian thistle, zebra mussels, creationists — and now, Rasberry Crazy Ants, Paratrechina sp. nr. pubens.

(Hey, Texas A&M spells it “Rasberry” without a “p,” so do I.  It’s named after Pearland, Texas, exterminator Tom Rasberry, who first identified the Texas pest.)

Remember the wonderful old Japanese monster movies, where monsters from past Tokyo ransackings would return to fight the new monsters?  Texas could use a good Godzilla or two.

Texas A&M’s Center for Urban and Structural Entomology has an extensive information and warning piece out on the beasts — reprinted for you below the fold.

Look what else you can find:

Read the rest of this entry »


Education and teaching blogs, new ones, good ones

September 12, 2009

Good teachers constantly search for good ideas and effective ways to make learning fun, efficient and thorough. So the search for new material and new ideas is constant.

Same on the web.  Where are the good blogs?  Where are the useful blogs?  (Many days readers here ask those questions repeatedly.)

You’re a teacher, parent,  or administrator?  Take a look at this open thread at Clay Burrell’s Beyond Teaching (“I hate schooliness.  I love learning.”) Clay asked for recommendations on favorite blogs about 21st century teaching.

Isn’t it astounding how many new, good teacher  blogs show up every year?  I found a dozen new sources in a few minutes.


%d bloggers like this: