Quote of the moment: Potter Stewart, on the freedom to procreate without government intrusion

August 31, 2013

Justice Potter Stewart, official portrait in the U.S. Supreme Court. Artist: Ruth A. Nestor Hamilton. Oyez image.

Justice Potter Stewart, official portrait in the U.S. Supreme Court. Artist: Ruth A. Nestor Hamilton. Oyez image.

Several decisions of this Court make clear that freedom of personal choice in matters of marriage and family life is one of the liberties protected by the Due Process Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment. […] As recently as last Term, in Eisenstadt v. Baird, 405 U. S. 438, 405 U. S. 453, we recognized “the right of the individual, married or single, to be free from unwarranted governmental intrusion into matters so fundamentally affecting a person as the decision whether to bear or beget a child.” That right necessarily includes the right of a woman to decide whether or not to terminate her pregnancy.

Potter Stewart (1915-1985) US Supreme Court Justice (1959-81)
Roe v. Wade, 410 U.S. 113, 169-170 (1973) [Concurring]
(Source)

Links added here, except “Source.”  Handing the scrub brush to WIST, so WIST may tip it to itself.


Quote of the moment: James Madison, education, or farce and tragedy

August 31, 2013

James Madison Building, Library of Congress -- the official Madison Memorial

James Madison Building of the Library of Congress, the official James Madison Memorial for the nation

A popular Government, without popular information, or the means of acquiring it,
is but a Prologue to a Farce or a Tragedy; or perhaps both.
Knowledge will forever govern ignorance.

And a people who mean to be their own governours,
must arm themselves with the power which knowledge gives.

— James Madison in a letter to W. T. Barry, August 4, 1822

This is an encore post, partly.

Photo of inscription to the left (north) of the main entrance on Independence Ave., of the James Madison Building, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

Photo of inscription to the left (north) of the main entrance on Independence Ave., of the James Madison Building, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

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Immigration policy: Surprise answers from the Dallas Branch, Federal Reserve

August 30, 2013

Did you miss this interview last spring?

Pia Orrenius knows more about the economic effects of immigration on the modern U.S. than almost any other person alive — her job is to study immigration economics for the Dallas Branch of the Federal Reserve Bank.  As a dull economics researcher, she can be quite lively — in a bank of economics presentations, Orrenius will deliver the goods and keep you wide awake.  To deserved astonishment, Orrenius’s work is occasionally published by the right-wing generally isolationist American Enterprise Institute.

Pia Orrenius, Dallas Federal Reserve economist, Photo by David Woo, Dallas Morning News

Caption from the Dallas Morning News: Dallas Federal Reserve economist Pia Orrenius co-wrote a book on immigration reform with economist Madeline Zavodny. (Photo by David Woo/DMN)

Last spring the Dallas Morning News interviewed Dr. Orrenius, with a short version published in the Sunday “Viewpoints” section.  You could learn a lot from her.  In its entirety, for study purposes, the interview  from June 21, 2013 (links added):

Prepare to have your preconceived notions about immigration challenged. Pia Orrenius, 45, was born in Sweden and raised and educated in the U.S. She is a labor economist with the Dallas Federal Reserve Bank who has been studying the impact of immigration for two decades. Orrenius sees immigration through the prism of research, resulting in views that buck much of today’s accepted political dogma. She supports relaxing immigration restrictions for high-skilled workers and extending portable work visas to low-skilled workers, and warns of the unintended consequences of increased border enforcement.

It seems when we talk about immigration from a political perspective, much of the focus is on border enforcement. How important is border enforcement?

In terms of the immigration debate, border enforcement — while it’s very necessary and an important component of immigration policy and national security policy and defense policy — has unintended consequences. I know some people like to argue that border enforcement is not effective. It is, actually, effective. It’s just that you need a lot of it for it to be effective. And it’s very expensive. So you put all this costly border enforcement in place, and what happens? Fewer people get in. When fewer people get in, the wages of illegal immigrants go up. So if you’re lucky enough to get in, the reward is higher. That’s one unintended consequence.

I’ve heard you speak before about cyclical migration patterns and how, by making it so difficult to get in, people who once came alone now bring families. And families are what create the negative economic impact, because they use up education and health care dollars.

It reduces the circularity [of migration patterns] so people stay here longer. And they are also more likely to try to reunify with their families by bringing them here. So you actually have this unintended consequence of initially increasing the permanent population of illegal immigrants when you implement tough border enforcement. Whereas people before were more likely to leave their families in, say, Mexico and just migrate for work and then migrate home.

Last week, the Senate killed John Cornyn’s amendment to the immigration reform bill, which would have required raising the current 45 percent apprehension rate to 90 percent. What do you think a 90 percent rate would do?

If you put a border patrol agent every other meter on the border with Mexico, yes, you will not have any illegal immigration because they will be standing there in the way. But the question that’s not being asked is: At what price? At what cost to the taxpayers? And what else could you do with that money?

Then what do we do about illegal immigration?

Interior enforcement. Interior enforcement policies are, in so many ways, superior. They’re not nearly as expensive and are more efficient. If you have sensible interior enforcement policy, like universal E-Verify, then you’re really going to reduce the pressure on the border and save resources.

What’s the impact of illegal immigration on U.S. workers?

For native workers who compete closely with low-skilled immigrants, there is an adverse wage effect. But it’s quite small, smaller than you would think. And you don’t really find any adverse effects with high-skilled immigrants. Other forces drive wages to a much greater extent. Labor economists generally agree the most detrimental force on low-skilled wages, especially blue-collar men, is technology. And globalization — the offshoring of jobs that were traditionally high-paying. There are other things like the decline of unionization and in the real value of the minimum wage.

There have also been changes in the U.S.-born workforce — the aging that people talk a lot about and the increased education levels. The supply of U.S.-born workers who have less than a high school degree has been falling over time and is continuing to fall. These workers coming from Mexico and other countries are filling a niche.

Demographer Steve Murdoch has often said that, because of the graying of the U.S. workforce, we need a significant in-flow of immigration.

Does the economy need immigration? Do we need faster economic growth, do we need a more efficient, productive economy? Do we need it, or do we want it? That’s the distinction. If we want the economy to grow at potential, if we want to continue to rely on the services we’re accustomed to at a cost we’re accustomed to, if we want to continue living the way we have been living, yes, we need these workers. It’s just that the word need is tricky in this context.

A lot of the back story to what’s happening in Washington today has to do with what happened with the Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986. There’s a feeling that we gave illegal immigrants a path to citizenship and now we have three or four times as many.

What happened with IRCA is that we legalized 2.7 million undocumented immigrants and then, 25 years later, we have 11 million more. But there are several reasons why what happened under IRCA is not going to happen again. First, look at the supply. Look at where people were coming from. They were overwhelmingly coming from Mexico. Well, that supply push has gone away. Mexican fertility has fallen from six to eight children per woman down to two to 21/2 per woman. (Don’t ask me how you can have half a child.)

Yeah, the poor mother. Actually, the figure you cited in your report is 2.2.

OK, 2.2. So you don’t have that demographic pressure coming from Mexico.

Another reason is technology. In the ’80s and ’90s, it was so hard to enforce the border because we didn’t have the technology to process these people. We couldn’t take their fingerprints and keep them in a database. It was a revolving door. Nowadays, we know exactly who they are, who’s getting caught two, three, four times. And we can implement interior enforcement as well. And pretty cheaply, like an E-Verify program. That was not possible 20 years ago. With technology, we will never go back to where we were before, where a half a million or a million undocumented immigrants were coming in, on net, in a given year. We’ll never go back to that.

This Q&A was conducted and condensed by editorial writer Ralph De La Cruz. His email address is rdelacruz@dallasnews.com. Pia Orrenius’ email address is pia.orrenius@dal.frb.org.

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Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas, Pearl Street (...

Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas, Pearl Street (Uptown), Dallas, Texas; Wikipedia image. The Dallas FRB has a wonderful collection of regional art — all unfortunately out of public view.


Education blogs: The second hundred most influential

August 30, 2013

Classroom blogs from David Reese Elementary in California -- how many classroom blogs made the lists of 200 most influential education blogs?  I'll guess it was zero.  Am I wrong?

Classroom blogs from David Reese Elementary in California — how many classroom blogs made the lists of 200 most influential education blogs? I’ll guess it was zero. Am I wrong? [Yes, I’m wrong. See Mr. Salsich’s classroom blog, for example.]

Round 2 of influential education blogs, from Onalytical.  Between this list, and the list of the top 100, which of your favorite and influential education blogs are NOT listed?  Numbers 101 to 200:

Further to our ranking of education blogs published last week, here is the list of the top 101 to 200 most influential education blogs, ordered by their Onalytica Influence Index.

Rank Name Influence Popularity Over-Influence
101 Research in Practice 14.2 10.3 1.0
102 Education Intelligence Agency 14.0 6.4 1.2
103 Stump The Teacher 13.8 20.5 0.6
104 Science teacher 13.8 10.3 1.0
105 LEADING IS LEARNING. 13.7 2.6 1.5
106 Educational Technology Guy 13.6 12.8 0.8
107 All Things Education 13.6 7.7 1.1
108 Doug Belshaw 13.4 15.4 0.8
109 English Raven 13.3 14.1 0.8
110 Hooked on Innovation 13.2 7.7 1.0
111 The Edge of Tomorrow 13.2 5.1 1.2
112 happy hooligans 13.1 3.8 1.3
113 Teach Preschool 12.8 5.1 1.2
114 Teach Children Well 12.8 10.3 0.9
115 The 21st Century Principal 12.6 7.7 1.0
116 Ed & Workforce Dems 12.6 5.1 1.2
117 21st Century Fluency Project 12.5 10.3 0.9
118 Fair Languages 12.5 3.8 1.3
119 educationrealist 12.4 6.4 1.1
120 Steve Sailer: iSteve 12.4 5.1 1.2
121 Kirsten Winkler 12.4 6.4 1.1
122 100 Scope Notes 12.4 9.0 0.9
123 leavingcertenglish.net 12.3 1.3 1.5
124 Teach them English 12.3 12.8 0.8
125 The Tech Savvy Educator 12.3 9.0 0.9
126 Bulldog Readers Blog 12.2 11.5 0.8
127 Primary Tech 12.2 14.1 0.7
128 Beyond School 12.2 5.1 1.1
129 edtech digest 12.1 11.5 0.8
130 Sherman Dorn 12.1 9.0 0.9
131 teachbytes 12.1 10.3 0.8
132 eFace Today 12.0 7.7 1.0
133 Anseo! 12.0 2.6 1.3
134 Watch. Connect. Read. 12.0 12.8 0.7
135 My Web 2.0 Journey 12.0 7.7 1.0
136 Successful Teaching 11.9 7.7 1.0
137 The Jose Vilson 11.9 6.4 1.0
138 Bill Boyd – The Literacy Adviser 11.9 1.3 1.5
139 Moturoa  11.9 3.8 1.2
140 PHSdirectorBLOG 11.9 3.8 1.2
141 21st Century Collaborative 11.8 7.7 0.9
142 Donald Clark Plan B 11.8 10.3 0.8
143 Creating Lifelong Learners 11.8 3.8 1.2
144 21k12 11.8 15.4 0.7
145 Education for Everyone 11.7 2.6 1.3
146 Love Learning…. 11.7 7.7 0.9
147 Principals Page 11.7 7.7 0.9
148 The Daily Riff 11.7 5.1 1.1
149 Reflections on Teaching 11.6 6.4 1.0
150 SCC English 11.6 2.6 1.3
151 TechChef 11.5 7.7 0.9
152 The Busy Librarian 11.5 9.0 0.9
153 Learning in Technicolor 11.5 12.8 0.7
154 teach from the heart 11.4 5.1 1.1
155 The Unquiet Librarian 11.3 7.7 0.9
156 Life is not a race to be first finished 11.3 3.8 1.1
157 Ozge Karaoglu’s Blog 11.2 15.4 0.6
158 New Tech Network 11.2 3.8 1.1
159 CristinaSkyBox 11.2 6.4 1.0
160 C-O Connections 11.2 3.8 1.1
161 Dr. Cook’s Blog 11.1 6.4 1.0
162 Blogging through the Fourth Dimension 11.1 15.4 0.6
163 Fearghal’s blog 11.1 3.8 1.1
164 Catlin Tucker 11.1 12.8 0.7
165 The Avery Bunch 11.1 12.8 0.7
166 Mr. Salsich’s Class 11.1 10.3 0.8
167 Venspired 11.1 12.8 0.7
168 The Number Warrior 11.1 10.3 0.8
169 Edukwest 11.0 7.7 0.9
170 kitchen table math, the sequel 11.0 7.7 0.9
171 Shifting Phases 11.0 7.7 0.9
172 An A-Z of ELT 11.0 21.8 0.5
173 Oliver Quinlan 11.0 9.0 0.8
174 Teaching Chemistry 10.9 2.6 1.2
175 #batttuk 10.8 2.6 1.2
176 Burcu Akyol’s BLOG 10.8 9.0 0.8
177 Educator, Learner 10.8 3.8 1.1
178 4C in ELT 10.8 14.1 0.6
179 21 st Century Educational Technology and Learning 10.8 12.8 0.7
180 Labour Teachers 10.7 9.0 0.8
181 Teacher Tom 10.7 9.0 0.8
182 Reading By Example 10.7 7.7 0.9
183 Geeky Mom 10.7 3.8 1.1
184 4KM And 4KJ @ Leopold Primary School 10.7 16.7 0.6
185 Mike Klonsky’s SmallTalk Blog 10.7 7.7 0.8
186 transformED 10.6 9.0 0.8
187 molehills out of mountains 10.6 5.1 1.0
188 West Hunter 10.6 2.6 1.2
189 Local Schools Network 10.6 7.7 0.8
190 Ecology of Education 10.5 3.8 1.1
191 Vicky Loras’s Blog 10.5 21.8 0.5
192 opencontent.org 10.5 7.7 0.8
193 Blogging about the Web 2.0 Connected Classroom 10.4 14.1 0.6
194 Penelope Trunk 10.4 3.8 1.1
195 Drape’s Takes 10.4 6.4 0.9
196 Clouducation 10.4 5.1 1.0
197 Lexical Linguist 10.4 5.1 1.0
198 The Speech Guy 10.4 2.6 1.2
199 speechie apps 10.4 5.1 1.0
200 Teachers At Risk 10.4 2.6 1.2

Posted: 24 June 2013 12:39 • By: Andreea Moldovan

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Econ blogs! What about the top education blogs?

August 30, 2013

Turns out Onalytica ranks education blogs, too — in fact, they’ve done it twice, with an update already.

“Education blog” graphic found at Natural by Design

Here are the top 100 education blogs (no surprise; Millard Fillmore’s Bathtub is not among them) — the second hundred, I’ll list in a separate post.

The methodology sounds solid — but isn’t it interesting that they missed so many education blogs in their first cut in January?  I wonder what that means.

Logo for Onalytical Indexes

Logo for Onalytical Indexes

Which of your favorites are not on the list at all?

In a previous post we published a list of the top 100 most influential education blogs, ranked by their Onalytica Influence Index. Six months on, we have made an updated list of the top influential bloggers.

For a detailed explanation of the methodology we refer to our previous post. As before, we report the following metrics: Onalytica Influence Index, Popularity and Over-Influence.

The Influence Index is the impact factor of the blogs, similar to the impact factor of academic journals; Popularity measures how well-known a blog is among other education blogs and Over-Influence seeks to capture how influential a blog is compared to how popular it is.

The movements in the ranking have been caused by a change in the quantity and quality of citations that a blog has received. If a blog has gone up it means that it has been cited by more influential blogs lately and/or has received a higher number of citations. Moreover, there are new influential blogs that we have only recently started monitoring.

Stay tuned for more updates on education blog rankings.

Change In Rank Rank Name Influence Popularity Over-Influence
1 Dan Meyer’s Blog 100.0 82.1 1.6
2 Hack Education 97.4 42.3 2.7
3 ↑ 3 Dangerously Irrelevant 63.7 59.0 1.3
34 ↑ 4 Diane Ravitch’s Blog 61.9 66.7 1.2
2 ↓ 5 The Principal of Change 61.8 56.4 1.3
3 ↑ 6 Free Technology for Teachers 58.2 93.6 0.8
17 ↑ 7 Will Richardson’s Blog 53.5 37.2 1.6
8 ↑ 8 Stephen Downes 48.2 25.6 1.9
New Entry ★ 9 Cool Cat Teacher Blog 47.9 46.2 1.2
New Entry ★ 10 Steve Hargadon’s blog 45.2 30.8 1.6
3 ↓ 11 The Blue Skunk Blog 44.8 33.3 1.5
8 ↓ 12 Larry Ferlazzo’s Websites of the Day … 44.2 70.5 0.8
1 ↑ 13 Getting Smart 42.3 34.6 1.4
New Entry ★ 14 for the love of learning 40.8 35.9 1.3
3 ↓ 15 Practical Theory 38.0 30.8 1.3
9 ↓ 16 Ideas and Thoughts 36.7 38.5 1.1
New Entry ★ 17 Computing Education Blog 35.9 9.0 2.7
8 ↑ 18 The Learning Spy 35.1 35.9 1.1
14 ↓ 19 The Learning Network 35.1 34.6 1.1
New Entry ★ 20 On an e-Journey with Generation Y 33.1 7.7 2.6
9 ↑ 21 Shanker Blog 32.4 28.2 1.2
29 ↑ 22 Kevin’s Meandering Mind 32.1 16.7 1.7
New Entry ★ 23 Granted, and…thoughts on education by Grant Wiggins 29.9 33.3 1.0
New Entry ★ 24 The Core Knowledge Blog 29.6 21.8 1.3
New Entry ★ 25 The Education Trust 29.1 11.5 1.9
4 ↓ 26 Around the Corner-Mguhlin.org 28.4 12.8 1.8
New Entry ★ 27 Angela Maiers’ Blog 28.1 34.6 0.9
6 ↑ 28 This Week in Education 27.5 17.9 1.4
14 ↓ 29 Ewan McIntosh’s edu.blogs.com 27.1 21.8 1.2
10 ↓ 30 Moving at the Speed of Creativity 26.9 37.2 0.8
21 ↓ 31 The Thinking Stick 26.3 21.8 1.2
4 ↓ 32 David Warlick 25.6 25.6 1
New Entry ★ 33 Lisa Nielsen – The Innovative Educator 25.1 30.8 0.9
New Entry ★ 34 Tech Transformation 24.8 5.1 2.3
4 ↓ 35 Continuous Everywhere But Differentiable Nowhere 24.7 19.2 1.2
New Entry ★ 36 f(t) 24.4 20.5 1.1
New Entry ★ 37 I Speak Math 24.1 12.8 1.5
20 ↓ 38 Cogdogblog 23.8 20.5 1.1
29 ↑ 39 Action-Reaction 23.8 16.7 1.3
New Entry ★ 40 Math Mistakes 23.7 14.1 1.4
New Entry ★ 41 The Daring Librarian 23.5 23.1 1.0
23 ↓ 42 Open Thinking 23.3 21.8 1.0
New Entry ★ 43 Shawn Cornally’s Blog 23.0 20.5 1.1
New Entry ★ 44 Larry Cuban on School Reform and Classroom Practice 22.8 34.6 0.7
10 ↓ 45 Nerdy Book Club 22.8 30.8 0.8
New Entry ★ 46 always learning 22.7 14.1 1.3
14 ↓ 47 Learning in Hand 22.3 17.9 1.1
23 ↓ 48 Doug – Off the Record 22.2 16.7 1.2
New Entry ★ 49 Gary Rubinstein’s Blog 22.0 16.7 1.2
New Entry ★ 50 edrethink 21.7 26.9 0.8
New Entry ★ 51 TonyBaldasaro.com 21.6 2.6 2.4
20 ↓ 52 Let’s Play Math! 21.2 9.0 1.6
New Entry ★ 53 Change Agency 20.5 5.1 1.9
New Entry ★ 54 The Edublogger 20.2 100.0 0.3
55 Eduwonk.com 20.0 17.9 1.0
11 ↑ 56 Linking and Thinking on Education 19.9 15.4 1.1
New Entry ★ 57 Daniel Willingham’s blog 19.6 24.4 0.8
New Entry ★ 58 Colossal 19.6 6.4 1.7
2 ↓ 59 The Wejr Board 19.2 15.4 1.1
6 ↓ 60 Jay P. Greene’s Blog 19.2 16.7 1.0
61 My Island View 19.0 29.5 0.7
New Entry ★ 62 Van Meter Library Voice 18.6 15.4 1.0
New Entry ★ 63 Lost in Recursion 18.3 11.5 1.2
New Entry ★ 64 Computer Science Teacher 18.2 7.7 1.5
54 ↓ 65 David Wees 17.8 15.4 1.0
New Entry ★ 66 @theresashafer 17.7 2.6 2.0
New Entry ★ 67 Teachers as Technology Trailblazers 17.7 11.5 1.2
New Entry ★ 68 Digital Leader Network 17.5 2.6 1.9
New Entry ★ 69 Tait Coles @totallywired77 – Punk Learning 17.5 14.1 1.0
New Entry ★ 70 School Finance 101 17.1 19.2 0.8
New Entry ★ 71 Dropout Nation 17.1 11.5 1.1
New Entry ★ 72 Quantum Progress 17.0 15.4 1.0
New Entry ★ 73 Constructing Modern Knowledge 16.7 3.8 1.7
New Entry ★ 74 6D 2012 – 2013 Happy learners blog well 16.6 1.3 2.0
New Entry ★ 75 Remote Access even from here 16.3 7.7 1.3
59 ↓ 76 Annie Murphy Paul 16.3 23.1 0.7
New Entry ★ 77 iLearn Technology 16.3 16.7 0.9
New Entry ★ 78 A Difference 16.2 14.1 1.0
New Entry ★ 79 Bianca Hewes 16.2 6.4 1.4
10 ↓ 80 Marisa Constantinides – TEFL Matters 16.2 17.9 0.8
New Entry ★ 81 Nebraska Change Agent 15.9 9.0 1.2
New Entry ★ 82 Rational Expressions 15.7 11.5 1.0
21 ↓ 83 User Generated Education 15.7 15.4 0.9
48 ↓ 84 Assortedstuff 15.6 10.3 1.1
New Entry ★ 85 Half an Hour 15.7 11.5 1.0
41 ↓ 86 David Truss :: Pair-A-Dime for Your Thoughts 15.3 15.4 0.9
40 ↓ 87 I’m a teacher, get me OUTSIDE here! 15.1 9.0 1.1
New Entry ★ 88 Bob Sprankle’s Blog 14.9 7.7 1.2
New Entry ★ 89 The Doc Is In 14.9 1.3 1.8
32 ↓ 90 NYC Educator 14.9 10.3 1.0
New Entry ★ 91 Culture of Yes 14.8 10.3 1.0
New Entry ★ 92 Mrs. Yollis’ Classroom Blog 14.8 19.2 0.7
New Entry ★ 93 Math Mama Writes… 14.5 12.8 0.9
New Entry ★ 94 The Hum of Language Acquisition 14.5 5.1 1.3
New Entry ★ 95 Always Formative 14.4 12.8 0.9
New Entry ★ 96 Bud the Teacher 14.4 10.3 1.0
New Entry ★ 97 edcetera 14.3 9.0 1.1
New Entry ★ 98 The Fischbowl 14.3 17.9 0.7
28 ↓ 99 Learning in Burlington 14.2 15.4 0.8
New Entry ★ 100 Concrete Classroom 14.2 5.1 1.3

Posted: 18 June 2013 16:32 • By: Andreea Moldovan

Tip of the old scrub brush to Flemming Madsen at Onalytica.

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Exact spot – a place to dream

August 28, 2013

Pic Tweet from the National Park Service: Beautiful photo of the exact spot Dr. King delivered his

Pic Tweet from the National Park Service: Beautiful photo of the exact spot Dr. King delivered his “I Have a Dream speech” 50 years ago today. #MLKdream50 pic.twitter.com/MHwWsY7Hwp

Nice photo from the Lincoln Memorial looking toward the Washington Monument across the length of the Reflecting Pool.

This photo was taken at least several months ago, before the scaffolding went up on the Washington Monument for repairs for damage from the 2011 earthquake.  It’s a winter or fall picture, I’m guessing from the bare trees, and taken early in the morning, as the sun rises in the east over the Capitol and Washington Monument.  That is one of the best times to be at the Lincoln Memorial, in my experience.  The man in the photo has the historic spot very much to himself at that time.

Engraving on the stone says:

I HAVE A DREAM
MARTIN LUTHER KING, JR.
THE MARCH ON WASHINGTON
FOR JOBS AND FREEDOM
AUGUST 28, 1963

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President Lincoln and Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., in the Oval Office

August 28, 2013

I remember, just a year ago, when the GOP candidate for president promised to make this photo impossible, replacing King with an Englishman.

150 years later, 50 years later, change gotta come, still.

A better version of the photo:

Painting of Abraham Lincoln, bust of Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., together in the Oval Office, White House. (Pete Souza photo?)

Painting of Abraham Lincoln, bust of Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., together in the Oval Office, White House. (Pete Souza photo?) Photo published on August 28, 2013, the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington.

Oval office, Martin Luther King, March on Washington, Abraham Lincoln

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