Colorado schoolhouse (1895 vintage)

August 18, 2014

A few miles from the New Mexico border, in Chromo, Colorado:

East of Durango, along U.S. Highway 160, a school building with a sign suggesting it was built in 1895.

East of Durango, along U.S. Highway 160 84, a school building with a sign suggesting it was built in 1895.  The map said it was Chromo, Colorado.  Photos by Ed Darrell; use with attribution is encouraged.

Difficult to tell how many rooms; it could have had up to four classrooms at one point, I reckon.  The belfry is still there, but the bell is long gone — a prize for some scavenger if it was not removed for re-use, or for a museum.

Bigger windows that many modern schools, windows students could use to actually look outdoors.  Modern school architects seem to want students to be unaffected by the outdoors, or light from outdoors, often.

Off in a field by itself, there was plenty of room for kids to run around, at recess.

Off in a field by itself, there was plenty of room for kids to run around, at recess.

In this photo the sign is legible:  "Colorado State Approved School, 1895."

In this photo the sign is legible: “State of Colorado 1895 Approved Standard School.”

Was this a standard design, or does “standard school” refer to the program of instruction offered?

There were a few homes and farms close by.  The community has always been small.  How many students learned to read, learned how to handle numbers, read the greats of American history and literature in these walls?  Who were they, and where did they go?

How big a mark can a school, or a teacher, actually make?

More:


Photographs for which there are no words: Some hurdles to Back-to-School in Gaza

August 18, 2014

Getty images. A young boy at the blackboard of a school in Gaza, August 2014. Via BBC.

Getty images. A young boy at the blackboard of a school in Gaza, August 2014. Via BBC.

Gaza got bombed 97 years ago when the British seized it, in World War I.

In the 21st century, things have not changed enough for the people who live in the area.

It’s even worse in Gaza than it was for the West Bank earlier.

 


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