Colorado schoolhouse (1895 vintage)


A few miles from the New Mexico border, in Chromo, Colorado:

East of Durango, along U.S. Highway 160, a school building with a sign suggesting it was built in 1895.

East of Durango, along U.S. Highway 160 84, a school building with a sign suggesting it was built in 1895.  The map said it was Chromo, Colorado.  Photos by Ed Darrell; use with attribution is encouraged.

Difficult to tell how many rooms; it could have had up to four classrooms at one point, I reckon.  The belfry is still there, but the bell is long gone — a prize for some scavenger if it was not removed for re-use, or for a museum.

Bigger windows that many modern schools, windows students could use to actually look outdoors.  Modern school architects seem to want students to be unaffected by the outdoors, or light from outdoors, often.

Off in a field by itself, there was plenty of room for kids to run around, at recess.

Off in a field by itself, there was plenty of room for kids to run around, at recess.

In this photo the sign is legible:  "Colorado State Approved School, 1895."

In this photo the sign is legible: “State of Colorado 1895 Approved Standard School.”

Was this a standard design, or does “standard school” refer to the program of instruction offered?

There were a few homes and farms close by.  The community has always been small.  How many students learned to read, learned how to handle numbers, read the greats of American history and literature in these walls?  Who were they, and where did they go?

How big a mark can a school, or a teacher, actually make?

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5 Responses to Colorado schoolhouse (1895 vintage)

  1. Bob Becker says:

    Ed: nope. Never quite sank to the level of journalist to pay the bills. (grin)

    Like

  2. Ed Darrell says:

    (Bob, did you work with the Daily Utah Chronicle once upon a time?)

    Like

  3. Ed Darrell says:

    We have a school in Duncanville, Kennemer MS, that feels a lot like a prison inside — largely due to those high windows.

    It’s been explained to me that such windows prevent daydreaming. That’s what I fear.

    Like

  4. Bob Becker says:

    Re: windows, school archetecture. Some modern schools seem to be designed as if they were intended to repel attacks. Thin firing-slot windows (if that), or a narrow course of windows running along the top of walls, letting light in w/o letting studets see out. Drove past a long low sparsely-windiwed building in Layton, UT, and friend asked if it was a detention center. Certainly looked like it could be one. It was of course a school. Have to wonder, sometimes, about some contemporary school design, what the hell were they thinking?

    Like

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