No shortcuts on the road to success; but watch out for low bridges


Meeting of trailer and railroad viaduct.  Photo credit, and location, unknown

Meeting of trailer and railroad viaduct. Photo credit, and location, unknown; here from Part380.com

Many already caught the irony.

I wonder:

  • Was the truck driver using GPS to plan the route?  Which system, so we can avoid it?
  • Stories in the past couple of days say robots should be doing all kinds of jobs, including driving cars and big trucks.  Can a robot do this?

Not to embarrass, but just for the record, does anyone know when and where this picture was taken?

Tip of the old scrub brush to Andre Houser.

5 Responses to No shortcuts on the road to success; but watch out for low bridges

  1. Edward Green says:

    Any of the three viaduct photos could have been taken in my old Brooklyn neighborhood – the elevated subway (yes, that is in fact an oxymoron) crossed the avenues just that way, and I saw two trailers hit the same one – best one rolled its roof off literally like a sardine can, if you remember the old keyed sardine cans.

    You would think this was a problem that was solved 75 years ago, and it probably was. But standards are unfair to stupid people.

    Like

  2. Ed Darrell says:

    Mr. Higginbotham, your search abilities amaze me.

    Your post went into spam, and it almost got deleted in the scheduled dump. If you post something that doesn’t appear, drop me an e-mail and let me know. Or try to post another comment.

    Thanks!

    Like

  3. no appropriate words on truck, but the weight limit bit …

    Truckers are questioning how Mary Lambright, the woman who drove a semi-truck with a 53-foot box trailer that was carrying 43,000 pounds of bottled water onto a tiny, historic bridge in Paoli Indiana, ever got her CDL. The Indiana bridge was built in 1880 and had a weight limit of six tons. The 23-year-old trucker told police that she knew the bridge’s weight limit. The trucker even admitted that she saw the signage that stated that semis were not allowed to use the bridge.
    Unfortunately, Lambright was not comfortable backing up her Volvo box trailer, so she decided to chance it on the iron bridge. Lambright’s truck was five times heavier than the bridge’s posted weight limit. She drover a 30-ton truck onto a historic bridge, and her biggest defense was that she didn’t know how many pounds was equal to six tons, according to Truck Yeah.
    The trucker was planning on parking the truck in a Walmart parking lot, but she missed her exit. She tried to turn the truck around, according to WHAS 11, but several attempts proved unsuccessful, so she decided to cross the historic bridge instead. When she made it onto the bridge, the trailer’s top immediately started ripping off because the truck she was in was also too tall for the old bridge. As she drove further, police say, the bridge could not support the 30 tons of truck and water it was hauling and the bridge began to collapse.

    Read more at http://www.inquisitr.com/2663409/truckers-brutal-social-media-response-after-woman-with-cdl-destroys-indiana-bridge-built-in-1880/#Ria2xWuyIUtSgsZ9.99

    Like

  4. Ed Darrell says:

    And, from melbourne, Australia, via World Culture Pictorial:

    We can do it? Truck stuck under bridge

    Like

  5. Ed Darrell says:

    And then there was this one:

    (At GagReflex)

    Like

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