July 26, 2017, New York flies U.S. flags for statehood


Flags fly in July at Rockefeller Center, New York City. Photo by Ed Darrell; please use, with attribution.

Flags fly in July 2016 at Rockefeller Center, New York City. Photo by Ed Darrell; please use, with attribution.

New York became a state, historians say, on July 26, 1788, when the Constitution Ratification Convention for the colony approved the U.S. Constitution. Technically the nation did not yet exist, but in flag circles, we use the ratification date as the statehood day for the 18 original states.

Following the guide of the U.S. Flag Code, New Yorkers fly their U.S. flags today in honor of New York’s statehood.

More: 

  • Next date to fly Old Glory: July 27 (tomorrow!) for Korean War Veterans Armistice Day.

Save

Save

Save

Advertisements

2 Responses to July 26, 2017, New York flies U.S. flags for statehood

  1. Ed Darrell says:

    Thanks! US flags generally are photogenic, and when assembled in a bouquet like that one at Rockefeller Center, sometimes stirring.

    When I started pushing flag displays with this blog years ago, there was a great paucity of good photos of US flags in places and situations where you’d think they’d be common. I occasionally work to remedy some of that. On that hot July day I was put in mind of the 50 or so paintings by Childe Hassam of US flags and others in displays, circa 1917-1927.

    I think there were 32 US flags on display along the sidewalk, not counting the flags on the building. Packed much closer together than the 50 around the Washington Monument, or the 50 or more at many military cemeteries.

    Anthropologists from the distant future will think it’s some religious display. Often, it is.

    Like

  2. Your photo is impressive, especially when enlarged.

    Liked by 1 person

Please play nice in the Bathtub -- splash no soap in anyone's eyes. While your e-mail will not show with comments, note that it is our policy not to allow false e-mail addresses. Comments with non-working e-mail addresses may be deleted.

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: