Signs of life: Newt Crossing

April 28, 2018

From Instagram: pkwanpiOf course there's a #newtcrossing -- this is #berkeley after all! In Tilden Regional Park

From Instagram: pkwanpiOf course there’s a #newtcrossing — this is #berkeley after all! In Tilden Regional Park

Oakland side of San Francisco Bay has a stunning string of parks from the water’s edge, following abandoned rail lines, through parks in the city, wending and winding up into the mountains into real wilderness. It’s impressive, decades later, to remember the President’s Commission on Americans Outdoors touring these sites as they were being redeveloped from abandoned industrial sites, real brownfield recovery — and see what a grand complex it is now.

And there, one may find a newt crossing one’s path. Watch out for the newts!

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Something in the way ice moves on Utah Lake

April 25, 2018

Ice on Utah Lake, from a drone movie by Bill Church, screen capture.

Moving ice on Utah Lake, from a drone movie by Bill Church, screen capture.

Where does the great @BillChurchPhoto post his photos? (Update: On Instagram, and sales at BillChurchPhoto.com.) His work around Utah Lake, and Utah, is spectacular (and I hope people buy his images so he’s making money off of the great art he’s captured).

Here is a photo of plain old Utah Lake, in February. Church makes it look beautiful and exciting, instead of just cold and muddy.

Not sure I can embed this movie any other way:

More:

Tip of the old scrub brush to Utah State Parks on Twitter.


Deer in a lake, Oregon — stunning photo, a fake

April 15, 2018

From @BestEarthPix on Twitter:

It's a mule deer, in a lake. Which lake? Who was the lucky/skilled photographer? No details.

Frustratingly, the only information from @BestEarthPix is “Oregon, USA.” It’s a mule deer, in a lake. Which lake? Who was the lucky/skilled photographer? No details.

Can you supply details? The photographer should get credit, I think.

Update: This site, 500px, attributes the photo to Stijn Dijkstra. But Amazon.com/UK leads me to believe this is a sunrise at Yellowstone Lake, with a deer’s profile PhotoShopped in. See “Sunrise at Yellowstone Journal” and this photo.

From "Sunrise at Yellowstone Lake Journal," available from Amazon.com/UK

From “Sunrise at Yellowstone Lake Journal,” available from Amazon.com/UK

Further update: It’s a stock photo from Alamy, PhotoShopped.

The Flat Mountain arm of Yellowstone Lake at sunrise, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, 2016. Image courtesy Neal Herbert/Yellowstone National Park. Gado Images/Alamy Stock Photo

How disappointing, and maddening, that what looks like a great image turns out to be faked.


Utah Lake in the cold

April 6, 2018

Jeff McGrath (@youtah) on Twitter: Utah Lake is just stunning right now. This was taken at the Northern End with my drone while flying for recreational fun. #utwx #dronephotography #recreationaldrone

Jeff McGrath (@youtah) on Twitter: Utah Lake is just stunning right now. This was taken at the Northern End with my drone while flying for recreational fun. #utwx #dronephotography #recreationaldrone

Northern end of Utah Lake, near Lehi, probably near the old boat launch and harbor near where the old amusement park Saratoga was (now a town loaded with housing tracts).

My grandfather, Leo Stewart, Sr., came into the world 30 or so miles south, in Benjamin, Utah, named after a family patriarch of sorts, Benjamin Franklin Stewart. When he was very young, my grandfather said, they’d boat out a half-mile or so into the lake and look down into 20 feet of water, and pick the giant trout they’d want to hook. That was in the late 19th century, of course.

In that sorry time 30 years later, some fool introduced European carp into the area, for more game fish. Carp dig up the shallow bottom and muddy the water. In my youth along the lake you could never see more than six inches into the lake. Because it was so far from everything else important, a steel plant was built at Geneva, about midway between north and south ends of the lake, during World War II — in case the mills in California were bombed. U.S. Steel eventually ended up with the plant.

From our home on the Lake Bonneville bench, 800 feet or so above the lake, we could watch the steel mill’s pouring of slag at night, a little flow of artificial magma to light the sky and look cool. The mill also dumped chemicals into the water which further clouded the view.

Tip of the old scrub brush to Utah State Parks.


Glorious thread on typewriters and their masters

November 22, 2017

From Dean Frey, posting on Twitter as “Deny Fear @dean_frey.”

Frey posted this wonderful picture of Rachel Carson, taken by Erich Hartmann in 1962 (after publication of Silent Spring?)

Rachel Carson and her typewriter, by Erich Hartmann, 1962.

Rachel Carson and her typewriter, by Erich Hartmann, 1962.

But hold your horses. Frey posted a raft of other artists with their machines. What a glorious little thread!

The entire glorious thread.

You have seen some of those photos, some of those artists, and some of those typewriters in other posts at Millard Fillmore’s Bathtub. There are some sparkling photos there I had not seen before.

Thank you, Dean Frey.


Virginia’s Bicycle Woman

November 9, 2017

Caption at Raw Story: Juli Briskman flips off Pres. Donald Trump (copyright @b_smialowski/@AFP)

Caption at Raw Story: Juli Briskman flips off Pres. Donald Trump (copyright @b_smialowski/@AFP)

In ten years, will we regard this photo as iconic as the Tank Man in China?

Is this a photo of a brave citizen standing up to oppressive power?

Unlike Tank Man, whose name and fate remain unknown, the woman was fired from her job. We should track the story.

Or, is there a chance that, in a decade after President Trump is deposed by legal means, we will look back and regard this photo as a citizen bullying poor old Trump?

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Eclipse 2017 lessons: Use a tripod!

August 24, 2017

Many lessons of chasing the eclipse for us first-timers. Months ago we decided not to make major purchases to photograph the thing, to just enjoy the experience.

Still, we had inexpensive filters, and we photographed. Main tripod left in Dallas to avoid paying a lot extra to fly; a borrowed tripod held the GoPro (which was a poor choice; gotta work on that for time-lapse). So the best photos I got were hand-held.

And fuzzy as a result, I think.

Totality of the 2017 solar eclipse, near Casper, Wyoming, on the North Platte River. Photo by Ed Darrell.

Totality of the 2017 solar eclipse, near Casper, Wyoming, on the North Platte River.

The most interesting thing to me was the brilliant red beads during totality, where (if I recall correctly) the Sun peeks through the mountains of the Moon. I did get a couple shots to show that.

Totality and red beads, photo by Ed Darrell

Totality and red beads of the 2017 solar eclipse.

 

Photographs to remind us of the great experience of joining millions of other people to watch a spectacular astronomical event, brought to us by science.

Did anyone at your house go blind? Ready for 2024?

Did you stay at home for the eclipse? Did you travel? What did you see and hear?

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