Cold day sunrise under Mt. Timpanogos

February 12, 2016

Tweet from @CharBailey5479: Sunrise shroud on Mt. Timpanogos - have a great day! #utwx #utah

Tweet from @CharBailey5479: Sunrise shroud on Mt. Timpanogos – have a great day! #utwx #utah

Utah’s Mount Timpanogos rises on the east side of Utah Valley, in Utah County, over Utah Lake.

At about 6,000 feet above the valley floor, the mountain can make its own weather at times. On a cold winter morning, sun struggling to climb over the peak can expose clouds from sublimating ice on the mountain, or clouds from ice crystals blown off the top slopes.

Any way they form, it can be a spectacular start to another day.

Much of my childhood was spent about five miles south and east of the spot this photo was taken (American Fork?). The mountain filled most of my bedroom window. A sunrise like this one would look like a forest fire in my room. But film was expensive, and my camera was a snapshot special.

Thanks to @CharBailey5479, whoever you are.


School in distant, difficult classrooms: Kenya

December 4, 2015

Photo from Heidi Totten, who is spearheading a campaign to get desks for schools like this one in Kenya:

Tenkees School, in the Mau region of Kenya. Photo by Heidi Totten

Tenkees School, in the Mau region of Kenya. Photo by Heidi Totten

Ms. Totten, working with a group called 100 Humanitarians (Entrepreneurs Changing the World), posted this in November, for a November 27 fundraising project.

Our next $5 Friday Fundraiser will be for additional desks for this school in the Mau region of Kenya. This is a very remote area that we visited. The school serves over 300 students with very few desks that they cram into.

They also have two latrines for each gender. With 300 kids you can imagine the sanitary conditions.

*   *   *   *   *

Our hope is to start with adding more desks, then rebuilding the kitchen and adding latrines. Just $5 can go far!

Please feel free to click over to this group and contribute.

How well would you or your kids learn in this school?

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Trump says China? Let’s go see

October 26, 2015

Kenny sent an e-mail, with a link to Donald Trump, saying “China.”

So, we went to see.

Among other things, Kenny’s brother James, our younger son, was getting married in Beijing.  Good excuse to travel.  Keeping with the rule that one should spend at least a day in a destination for every hour of travel it takes to get there, we planned 13 days.

I don’t think Donald Trump knows China.

After 13 days and a few thousand miles, and perhaps a few hundred supreme dumplings and two Beijing ducks, fugu, and noodles of nearly endless variety, with gallons of stout vinegars you won’t find in a U.S. supermarket, I know I don’t know China.

(I don’t think Trump knows much of anything, a very little in any depth; this is funnier now than it was when Kenny sent the link before the trip.)

Following, not always consecutively, some reports on some of the things we saw. Please stay tuned.

Wikipedia photo, by the way:

We saw the ancient city of Pingyao, Shanxi Province, where wheelers and dealers have been mincing people like Donald Trump for millennia. I’ll bet Trump didn’t go there. (This is a Wikipedia photo, by the way: “Pingyao-oldtown” by Benzh – Own work. Licensed under Public Domain via Commons – https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Pingyao-oldtown.jpg#/media/File:Pingyao-oldtown.jpg)

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A new day: Sunrise at Rooster Rock

September 9, 2015

We seek renewal in wilderness, and find that wilderness itself renews with every sunrise.

Mike Scofield photo, Sunrise at Rooster Rock in Table Rock Wilderness, Oregon

@BLMOregon: Rooster Rock #sunrise from the Table Rock #Wilderness near Molalla, #Oregon – photo: Mike Scofield #camping #hiking

Mike Scofield is a lucky guy to have been there to get that shot.

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Milky Way over New Zealand

August 3, 2015

Screen capture of one frame of Mark Gee's short film, "After Dark."

Screen capture of one frame of Mark Gee’s short film, “After Dark.”

Great little .gif, of the night sky in New Zealand.

From a Tweet by BBC Earth.  It’s taken from a slightly longer film put together by Mark Gee.

1440 individual photographs captured over 13 hours cut together into one incredible time-lapse video.

Photographer and videographer Mark Gee shot this breath-taking footage of the southern skies around his hometown of Wellington, New Zealand. The stunning one-minute clip is a collection of Mark’s most memorable night sky moments over the past year.

The majority of the video was shot on Wellington’s South Coast (watch out for air traffic) while the campfire and the camping scenes were filmed in Cape Palliser and the Tararua Ranges.

From Gee’s Youtube site, the longer film (1 minute!):


Signs of life: Eagles on Highway

July 30, 2015

One of our local pharmacists travels on vacations, and takes photos.  Pharmacies being what they are, people wait in line with nothing to do but count ticks on the clock.  No one takes a book to the pharmacy to wait.

But the guy, Mark de Zeeuw, has a good sense of customer service.  He got one of those photo frames that had a video display to show photos.  Over time, it morphed to an extra computer screen, and probably an old computer (don’t know for sure).

At the Tom Thumb supermarket in Duncanville, Texas, customers get to see photos of the pharmacist’s travels.  A lover of travel and photography, and a too-frequent customer at the pharmacy, I think I may have seen every photo on that harddrive.  Many of them are very good. He travels to Alaska and across the American west, and he’s got at least one telephoto that works well on wildlife — this I know from watching the photos.  I’ve never discussed it with the guy (who is always busy working on prescriptions, or fighting with insurance companies over the phone; Tom Thumb’s being a large company, there may be other pharmacists on duty at the time).

Okay, I’m shy.  I’ve wanted to ask him for copies of several of the photos to share, one in particular.  It’s a nice shot of the yellow warning/information signs you see at the side of a highway.  With a bright blue sky in back, and obviously a lot of unpopulated territory, it says “Eagles On Highway.”  I broke the shyness enough to learn it was a photo from eastern Utah.

Surely someone else noticed the sign?

Yep! Wonders of Google, Bing and flickr:  Here’s a shot I found at Wanderlust Cafe:

“Eagles on Hwy.” Sign on eastbound Interstate 70, near the Moab turnoff in Utah. Photo by Lou Ann Granger, via Wanderlust Cafe

Out on Interstate 70, the rabbits and occasional ground squirrel, lizard or coyote fall victim to speeding cars in the night.  In the daylight, carrion eaters — including eagles — clean up the road.  Alas, eagles have not been bred to recognize those vehicles, tiny in the distance, rush at them at 70 miles per hour. Worse, it’s a violation of federal law and regulations to kill the eagles (few are ever cited for accidents).

Local authorities put up signs warning drivers of this odd hazard: “Eagles on Highway.” Drivers are supposed to slow down, be wary, and avoid hitting the eagles.

Others grew curious about the signs, too. The Deseret News in Salt Lake City explained back in 1990 that six of the signs were put up, in hopes of reducing kills of immature golden eagles.

They have to rank as the most unusual highway signs anywhere in the state. But preliminary indications are the six “Eagles on Highway” warning signs in central Utah are doing the job.

Not a single golden eagle was struck by a car during the 1989-90 winter season.In the two years previous, 30 golden eagles were killed and another 11 crippled by automobiles on a stretch of I-70 between the Colorado border and the San Rafael Swell.

“We don’t know whether it’s because the mild winter has spread the birds around more or whether it’s because the prairie dog population is down and the birds have moved elsewhere, or what,” said Miles Moretti, regional supervisor for the Division of Wildlife Resources.

“What we do know is we’ve received a lot of comments from people seeing signs and watching the birds and being aware of the problem. From a public awareness standpoint the program is a success.”

I wonder if we can track down someone in authority with numbers to show the signs are working after 25 years.  And maybe I can get a copy of pharmacist de Zeeuw’s photo here — his is better, I think.

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Read the rest of this entry »


Catching the Subway, in Zion National Park, Utah

July 25, 2015

US Department of Interior Tweet: Simply stunning: That's the only way we can describe @ZionNPS's Subway. Pic by Tiffany Nguyen #Utah

US Department of Interior Tweet: Simply stunning: That’s the only way we can describe @ZionNPS’s Subway. Pic by Tiffany Nguyen #Utah

Gotta get back there.

James and Michelle made a trek there in 2013.

Subway in Zion Canyon National Park, photo by Michelle Xiang Li, 2013 (some rights reserved)

Subway in Zion Canyon National Park, photo by Michelle Xiang Li, 2013 (some rights reserved)

I wonder if it’s possible to take a dozen photos there without a few that take your breath away.

Rock, water and leaves. Photo from the Subway trip, by Michelle Xiang Li, 2013

Rock, water and leaves. Photo from the Subway trip, by Michelle Xiang Li, 2013


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