Maggie rose

July 22, 2009

Exquisite blooms of the "Maggie" rose (bourbon class) - in Kathryn Knowles' garden, summer 2009

Exquisite blooms of the "Maggie" rose (bourbon class) - in Kathryn Knowles' garden, summer 2009

Yes, I intended to leave the spent blossom there.  This is a real garden, where the flowers grow and fade.

Maggie is a “found” rose, robust in much of Texas, and a favorite of my wife’s.  The blossoms tend to glow, even at mid-day.  It will blossom all summer when it’s happy.  Maggie’s fragrance earns it a spot in Kathryn’s garden.

Maggie was one of five roses designated by Texas A&M’s horticulturists in 2005 for testing as one of a handful of roses easy to grow (read:  “difficult to kill, really”) in Texas.  Many rose varieties do not do well in southern heat and humidity — Maggie is one exception.

Maggie is a “found” Bourbon rose. It was collected in Louisiana by Dr. William Welch, Extension horticulturist from College Station. Maggie reaches 8 feet in height and 4 feet in width. Its flowers are medium red, very double, very fragrant, and it is a repeat bloomer. Researchers have found Maggie does best when trained on a pillar or fence. It is designated for zones 6-9.

“Arethusa, Jaune Desprez and Maggie are winter hardy throughout the entire state,” George said. “Bon Silene and Comtesse du Cayla, however, are winter hardy across most of the state except for Amarillo and the northern Panhandle area.”


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