Insta-Millard: Nevada’s Constitution doesn’t favor Cliven Bundy

April 15, 2014

It’s a relic of the Civil War and Congress’s intention to strengthen the Union when Nevada became a state in 1864, but there it is, in Section 2 of the Nevada Constitution, making a mockery of Cliven Bundy’s claim to owe allegiance to Nevada and its Constitution, but not to the U.S.:

Sec: 2.  Purpose of government; paramount allegiance to United States.  All political power is inherent in the people[.] Government is instituted for the protection, security and benefit of the people; and they have the right to alter or reform the same whenever the public good may require it. But the Paramount Allegiance of every citizen is due to the Federal Government in the exercise of all its Constitutional powers as the same have been or may be defined by the Supreme Court of the United States; and no power exists in the people of this or any other State of the Federal Union to dissolve their connection therewith or perform any act tending to impair[,] subvert, or resist the Supreme Authority of the government of the United States. The Constitution of the United States confers full power on the Federal Government to maintain and Perpetuate its existance [existence], and whensoever any portion of the States, or people thereof attempt to secede from the Federal Union, or forcibly resist the Execution of its laws, the Federal Government may, by warrant of the Constitution, employ armed force in compelling obedience to its Authority.

Sheesh!

Here’s the essay quiz, students:  The standoff between the Bureau of Land Management cowboys — each of whom swore an oath to uphold and defend the Constitution of the U.S., in contrast to Mr. Bundy who claims to owe no allegiance to the U.S. — and the armed mob who threatened to kill those same employees of our U.S. government:  Did Nevadans  (or Idahoans) violate any part of Section 2 of the Nevada Constitution?  Which clauses?

I used to say “the Sagebrush Rebellion is over; sagebrush won.”  Even the sagebrush are losing this one.

From The Atlantic:  Eric Parker, who lives in central Idaho, aims his weapon from a bridge as protesters gather by the Bureau of Land Management's base camp in Bunkerville, Nevada. (Jim Urquhart/Reuters)

From The Atlantic: Eric Parker, who lives in central Idaho, aims his weapon from a bridge as protesters gather by the Bureau of Land Management’s base camp in Bunkerville, Nevada. (Jim Urquhart/Reuters)  (See also Article III, Section 3 of the U.S. Constitution, with regard to Mr. Parker’s actions here.)

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As long as you’re in Nevada, see Fly Geyser

December 24, 2010

Way more than half the geysers in the world are in Yellowstone National Park.  There’s another big cluster in Iceland, and then a few in California.

But there are stragglers throughout the world, including this spectacular, nearly-man-made thing in Nevada:  Fly Geyser.

Nevada's Fly Geyser, Wikimedia image

Nevada's Fly Geyser, Wikimedia image, from Jeremy C. Munns; it's on private land, not open for tourists. Have you ever heard about it?

Lots of photos of the geyser at Kuriositas, where I learned of the thing.

It’s on private land, on Fly Ranch (from which the geyser and a nearby reservoir get their names), but visible from a public road.  You can find it about 20 miles north of Gerlach, on former State Route 34 (now County CR34) – in Washoe County in the northwest of the state.  From Interstate 80, one would need to drive west from Winnemucca on Nevada State Road 49(?), or north from Wadsworth on state highway 447, to Gerlach.

Locals drilled a well at the site in 1916.  For more than 40 years the well produced water with no problem.  But in 1960, the well blew out.  Hypothesis is that the well passed through heated rocks that contained water, and this heated, pressurized water blew out the well casing.  The geyser has been erupting since 1960, building the impressive mineral mountain seen in the photo.

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What does urban sprawl look like?

September 22, 2010

Teachers looking for a good way to portray urban sprawl, for geography and history classes, should take a look at this photo essay at the New York Times; unfortunately for teachers, Christoph Gielen’s stunning aerial landscapes cannot be copied for PowerPoint.

Gielen’s work is well known, and many of those same images can be found at other sites.  Images to illustrate “urbanization” and “urban sprawl” from internet sources generally carry a lot more punch than the stock photos delivered with textbooks.  Mind the copyrights.

Untitled X Nevada, urban sprawl in Nevada, copyright Christoph Gielen

(Caption from New York Times presentation): Untitled XI Nevada, 2010 This Vegas-area community was built by the same company that designed the circular communities on the outskirts of Phoenix in “Untitled X / XII / XI.” Credit: Christoph Gielen (Go see the presentation at the Times site to see the other photos)

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Republican advice to incest/rape victims: ‘Make lemonade’

July 9, 2010

You couldn’t make this stuff up if you tried.  I get e-mail from Democrats who think incest and rape victims should be protected:

Angle’s Lemons

Nevada Republican Sharron Angle might want to steer clear of radio talk shows.

Angle – who wants abortion banned under all circumstances – suggested that a 13-year-old girl who was raped by her father should just turn “a lemon situation into lemonade.” This is the same woman who suggested that getting pregnant after a rape just might be “God’s plan.”

This kind of utter disdain for the impact of rape on women’s lives simply can’t be tolerated – especially in the United States Senate.

Join us in telling Sharron Angle that her views are insensitive and out of touch.


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