Eclipse 2017 lessons: Use a tripod!

August 24, 2017

Many lessons of chasing the eclipse for us first-timers. Months ago we decided not to make major purchases to photograph the thing, to just enjoy the experience.

Still, we had inexpensive filters, and we photographed. Main tripod left in Dallas to avoid paying a lot extra to fly; a borrowed tripod held the GoPro (which was a poor choice; gotta work on that for time-lapse). So the best photos I got were hand-held.

And fuzzy as a result, I think.

Totality of the 2017 solar eclipse, near Casper, Wyoming, on the North Platte River. Photo by Ed Darrell.

Totality of the 2017 solar eclipse, near Casper, Wyoming, on the North Platte River.

The most interesting thing to me was the brilliant red beads during totality, where (if I recall correctly) the Sun peeks through the mountains of the Moon. I did get a couple shots to show that.

Totality and red beads, photo by Ed Darrell

Totality and red beads of the 2017 solar eclipse.

 

Photographs to remind us of the great experience of joining millions of other people to watch a spectacular astronomical event, brought to us by science.

Did anyone at your house go blind? Ready for 2024?

Did you stay at home for the eclipse? Did you travel? What did you see and hear?

Save

Advertisements

Clouds flow like water at Grand Canyon

July 17, 2017

Screen capture from the film, "Kaibab Elegy," by filmmakers Gavin Heffernan and Harun Mehmedinović, in Grand Canyon National Park.

Screen capture from the film, “Kaibab Elegy,” by filmmakers Gavin Heffernan and Harun Mehmedinović, in Grand Canyon National Park.

It’s beautiful, and it’s a reminder that Earth’s atmosphere is a giant pool of fluids, stuff flowing all the time.

It’s another Gavin Heffernan film, joined this time by Harun Mehmedinović.

MNN, the Mother Nature Network, alerted MFB to the film, and said:

The creators of “SKYGLOW,” a crowd-funded project showing the impact of urban light pollution through time-lapse videos, photos and a book, have another stunning video to share. In “Kaibab Elegy,” filmmakers Gavin Heffernan and Harun Mehmedinović visit Grand Canyon National Park and capture a rare weather event.

In the mesmerizing video, clouds build inside the canyon almost like bubbling water filling a jacuzzi as the sun rises and sets in the background, creating the pinkest sky you’ve ever seen. Those clouds roll like waves in the ocean and crash against the cliffs. This phenomenon is called full cloud inversion, and it happens when cold air is trapped in the canyon and topped by a layer of warm air, which combines with moisture and condensation.

“We were extremely lucky to be there to capture it, and it’s a collection of unique footage not found anywhere else,” Mehmedinović says.

He and Heffernan, who journeyed 150,000 miles around the globe for their new book and video series, work with the International Dark-Sky Association, a nonprofit fighting to preserve the dark skies around the world.

Tip of the old scrub brush to Mother Nature Network’s Twitter feed.

Save


Earth, shot on iPhones

June 9, 2017

You've seen the ad campaigns for iPhones appealing to your sense of beauty in photographs. Image form Daily Billboard.

You’ve seen the ad campaigns for iPhones appealing to your sense of beauty in photographs. Image form Daily Billboard.

A twist on the old saw: Put millions of good cameras in the hands of millions of people, and beauty will result.

Not that beauty will ALWAYS result, but that there will be much beauty found, if for no other reason we have a really beautiful planet.

It’s a commercial, sure. I still like it.

With poetry from Carl Sagan. (It’s not poetry? That’s just the way he wrote?)

And if  you want to share it, here’s the YouTube version from Apple:

Spoken text (done by Sagan himself?) comes from Pale Blue Dot, Carl Sagan’s paean to Earth:

The Earth is a very small stage in a vast cosmic arena. In our obscurity, in all this vastness, there is no hint that help will come from elsewhere to save us from ourselves. The Earth is the only world known so far to harbor life. There is no where else, at least in the near future, to which our species could migrate.

Like it or not, for the moment the Earth is where we make our stand. It underscores our responsibility to deal more kindly with one another and to preserve and cherish the only home we’ve ever known.

I wish I’d had this stuff when I was younger; so many beautiful places and people I must recall with only the images in memory!

More:

Save

Save

Save


New York street scene

April 5, 2017

Still life with traffic cone and fire hydrant. New York City. Photo creative commons copyright Ed Darrell; please use with attribution.

Still life with traffic cone and fire hydrant. New York City. Photo creative commons copyright Ed Darrell; please use with attribution.

Taxi in from La Guardia. Along Prince Street in Manhattan, July afternoon sun combined with a serendipitous arrangement of fire hydrant and traffic cone.

It made me smile, so I clicked a photo.


Signs of life: Sea monster in the neighborhood

March 2, 2017

Jamelle Bouie is just shooting stuff around the neighborhood. Love this one.

Jamelle Bouie found this in the neighborhood. No, I'm not sure which neighborhood, but clearly it's got some great neighbors.

Jamelle Bouie found this in the neighborhood. No, I’m not sure which neighborhood, but clearly it’s got some great neighbors. Details: Camera: Leica M5 with Canon LTM 35mm f/2 lens. Fuji Provia 100f. Copyright by Bouie, hope he doesn’t mind my using it here.

A more interesting neighborhood, perhaps, than most of us have. Or maybe not.

What’s in your neighborhood? Have you recorded it on film (or electrons), just for history’s sake? Why not?


Golly! Gollum jade plant

February 19, 2017

Yeah, like that Gollum.

In the sun, it’s a pleasant meditation on green luminescence.

Gollum jade plant

Gollum jade plant, Crassula ovata ‘Gollum,’ one of our indoor collection.

I know way too little about this thing, where it grows wild, why it evolved such unique leaves. But the sunlight passes over and through it as if they are old friends, and that gives me peace.

A single branch of Gollum jade. Photo by Ed Darrell, please share with attribution.

A single branch of Gollum jade. Photo by Ed Darrell, please share with attribution.

More:


Frosty Sandias

January 10, 2017

Sandia Peak on a frosty evening, from Mark Boslough

Sandia Peak on a frosty evening, from Mark Boslough

Living with a mountain provides myriad moments that cannot quite be captured on film, but must be filed away in memory to produce a smile at some future moment.

But, sometimes a camera can come close.

That last bit of sunlight at the top of the mountain, on a cold day, giving hope, or assurance, before it is snuffed out for a time by the rotation of the Earth.

The mountain will be there tomorrow. The Sun will return. The moment won’t be the same.


%d bloggers like this: