Another great speech of the 21st century: Kiwi MP Williamson on the effects of gay marriage

April 20, 2013

Two great legislative speeches in about two months!  (Here’s the other one, from Colorado State Sen. Mike Johnston.)

Maurice Williamson

Maurice Williamson (Photo credit: nznationalparty)

My faith in humanity’s ability to invent rhetoric to cause us to rise to an occasion is in danger of being restored.

Here’s New Zealand Member of Parliament Maurice Williamson, National-Pakuranga, making a case for a national law recognizing gay marriage (on April 17, 2013, I think):

The bill to recognize marriage between homosexual partners passed, 77-44.

New Zealand’s National Party is described as “center-right,” or like a U.S. Republican.  Can you imagine any member of the GOP in the U.S. House or the U.S. Senate having both the guts and the wit to make this speech?

Pakuranga is also leading the polls as the most humorous name for a political district, potentially displacing Cleveland for the first time.  It’s a Maori word, actually, with a beautiful definition, from Maori lore:  “Battle of the Sunlight.”

Tip of the old scrub brush to correspondent Devona Wyant, for finding the thing and sending a link.

More:


I get e-mail from Barack Obama

May 10, 2012

He’s talking about marriage:

Ed —

Today, I was asked a direct question and gave a direct answer:

I believe that same-sex couples should be allowed to marry.

I hope you’ll take a moment to watch the conversation, consider it, and weigh in yourself on behalf of marriage equality:

http://my.barackobama.com/Marriage

I’ve always believed that gay and lesbian Americans should be treated fairly and equally. I was reluctant to use the term marriage because of the very powerful traditions it evokes. And I thought civil union laws that conferred legal rights upon gay and lesbian couples were a solution.

But over the course of several years I’ve talked to friends and family about this. I’ve thought about members of my staff in long-term, committed, same-sex relationships who are raising kids together. Through our efforts to end the “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell” policy, I’ve gotten to know some of the gay and lesbian troops who are serving our country with honor and distinction.

What I’ve come to realize is that for loving, same-sex couples, the denial of marriage equality means that, in their eyes and the eyes of their children, they are still considered less than full citizens.

Even at my own dinner table, when I look at Sasha and Malia, who have friends whose parents are same-sex couples, I know it wouldn’t dawn on them that their friends’ parents should be treated differently.

So I decided it was time to affirm my personal belief that same-sex couples should be allowed to marry.

I respect the beliefs of others, and the right of religious institutions to act in accordance with their own doctrines. But I believe that in the eyes of the law, all Americans should be treated equally. And where states enact same-sex marriage, no federal act should invalidate them.

If you agree, you can stand up with me here.

Thank you,

Barack

A serendipitous campaign issue.  Something that actually was not planned!

Here’s an ABC-made YouTube clip of the critical part of the interview President Obama gave them yesterday:


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