Wasatch rainbow timelapse

May 18, 2016

Just your average spring day along the Wasatch Front in north Utah County, in Highland, Utah in Salt Lake County. Time lapse of the old mountains, and the clouds dancing around them as the sun goes down. A hint of the beauty the people of Utah live with every day — and that I hope they don’t take for granted!

It’s great there are so many electronic cameras around these days. A thousand times I’ve watched these things and lamented they couldn’t be captured. Mt. Timpanogos hides just the other side of that first line of mountains; if you know where to look, you can see its hulking shadow.

(When I lived in Utah County, this site was farmers’ fields, from here to the mountains.)

Tip of the old scrub brush to the Blue Lemon Cafe, “DanPopeGood4Utah,” and Evelyn Jeffries.


National Parks timelapse movie, “The Untouched”

July 27, 2015

Title shot from "The Untouched," a movie of time-lapse shots of U.S. National Parks.

Title shot from “The Untouched,” a movie of time-lapse shots of U.S. National Parks.

The Wilderness Society said:

This filmmaker traveled to 30 states and national parks to capture this gorgeous time-lapse video showcasing the beauty of untouched nature and our dark skies

Watch the video and read the account of all that goes into making a film like this. Amazing work!

From .  Details at Vimeo, where Manievannan discusses what the Parks showed of destructive climate change during the filming.

How many places can you identify? How many of them have you visited?

More:


Milky Way in Navajoland: YIKÁÍSDÁHÁ

May 13, 2014

Milky Way over Monument Valley Navajo Park. Photo by Gavin Heffernan and Harun Mehmedinović, from the video

Milky Way over Monument Valley Navajo Tribal Park. Photo by Gavin Heffernan and Harun Mehmedinović, from the video (which also features Grand Canyon National Park)

Phil Plait’s column/blog at Slate, Bad Astronomy, put me on to this one.  Wow.

You can see it at Vimeo, and read a lot more about the making of the film.

YIKÁÍSDÁHÁ (Navajo for Milky Way or “That Which Awaits the Dawn”)

Phil wrote:

And that they do. The Milky Way is the star of the show; the galactic bulge, disk, and dark fingers of vast dust lanes as clear as if this were taken from space. Well, sort of; I was impressed by the mix of clouds and sky, to be honest. The contrast was interesting, and it’s rather amazing the Milky Way could stand out so clearly above the cloud line.

One thing I want to point out specifically: At 2:10 in, a meteor flashes and leaves behind a curling wisp of what looks like smoke. This is called a persistent train, the vaporized remains of the meteoroid itself, and can glow for several minutes. The upper level winds from 60–100 km above Earth’s surface are what blow it into those curlicues.

More details, for more films from these guys:

Shot and Produced by: Gavin Heffernan and Harun Mehmedinović
Music: A Seated Night (Ambient) by Moby. Courtesy MobyGratis.com / Unknown Native Chant
Thanks: Northern Arizona University, Grand Canyon National Park, Monument Valley Tribal Park.

See other Sunchaser Timelapses on Vimeo here: vimeo.com/album/189653
LIKE Sunchaser Pictures on Facebook! facebook.com/SunchaserPicturesPage
LIKE Bloodhoney on Facebook! facebook.com/blood.honey.by.harun.mehmedinovic

For more from the artists:

BloodHoney.com
SunchaserPictures.com

 


Something about a campfire, in Arches National Park

November 8, 2013

Campfire in Arches National Park, by John Dale

Photographer John Dale wrote: “We rolled in to Arches National Park to a beautiful sunset and got to our campsite just as it got dark, but that left us with a clear sky, plenty of stars, and a fire to warm up next to. Here’s a photo from the timelapse I took that night.”

From a photographer named John Dale, via Arches National Park’s Facebook page.

More:

Map of Arches National Park, Utah, United Stat...

Map of Arches National Park, Utah, United States showing predominant features such as arches, peaks, rivers and streams, mines, and roads. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)


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