M.A.S.H. quote of the moment: War is worse than hell

May 22, 2017

"Why do you say that, Hawkeye?" Screen capture from video snippet of M.A.S.H.

“How do you figure that, Hawkeye?” Father Mulcahy, screen capture from video snippet of M.A.S.H.

Our correspondents Jameses, Stanley and Kessler, alerted me months ago to this exchange in the old television show, “M.A.S.H.” In a discussion of the First Battle of Bull Run, we discussed war as hell.

War is worse than hell, they said. Still true.

They pointed to a scene from “M.A.S.H.”

Dialogue borrowed from IMDB:

Hawkeye: War isn’t Hell. War is war, and Hell is Hell. And of the two, war is a lot worse.

Father Mulcahy: How do you figure that, Hawkeye?

Hawkeye: Easy, Father. Tell me, who goes to Hell?

Father Mulcahy: Sinners, I believe.

Hawkeye: Exactly. There are no innocent bystanders in Hell. War is chock full of them — little kids, cripples, old ladies. In fact, except for some of the brass, almost everybody involved is an innocent bystander.

Deep thinking, maybe wisdom, from a mobile operating room filtered through sit-com writers.

M.A.S.H., copyright 20th Century Fox

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Distant, difficult and broken classrooms: South Sudan, 2016

March 30, 2017

Millions of students across the world miss educations they should be getting, due to war, famine, weather or poverty.

ICRC caption: In the town of Kodok, South Sudan, a boy stands in a shuttered school, where classes have been closed for months after fighting intensified in the area. Photo: Jason Straziuso/ICRC

ICRC caption: In the town of Kodok, South Sudan, a boy stands in a shuttered school, where classes have been closed for months after fighting intensified in the area. Photo: Jason Straziuso/ICRC

What are the odds this boy will, within a few years, take up a gun to fight in a war, instead of finishing his education?

What can we do about it?


Distant and difficult classrooms: Yemen 2017

March 30, 2017

From the ICRC (International Committee of the Red Cross):

Red Cross caption: No books, no chairs, no safe place to learn: This is a classroom in #Yemen where 2 million children are out of school according to @UNICEF.

Red Cross caption: No books, no chairs, no safe place to learn: This is a classroom in #Yemen where 2 million children are out of school according to @UNICEF.

Two things essential for a classroom: Student, and teacher.

Ponder that next time your local school board denies raises to teachers. And remember this classroom in Yemen, where students want to learn, and a teacher goes into hell to let them do that.

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Distant and difficult classrooms: Syria, 2016

September 17, 2016

How do others outside the U.S. go to school?

Foreign Affairs featured a gallery of photos of a school in Syria, in a zone of war. School is still important. Students attend class in a cave, offering some protection from some bombs.

Internally displaced children attend a class inside a cave in the rebel-controlled village of Tramla, in Idlib province, Syria, March 27, 2016. Photo by Khalil Ashawi; Foreign Affairs photo

Internally displaced children attend a class inside a cave in the rebel-controlled village of Tramla, in Idlib province, Syria, March 27, 2016. Photo by Khalil Ashawi; Foreign Affairs photo and caption

Learning the Hard Way in Syria

In the rebel-controlled village of Tramla, in Syria’s Idlib province, the dusty stone steps to the town’s only primary school lead down to a damp cave. In February, a strike on two schools and five hospitals in Idlib province left 50 dead, many of whom were children. Before that, in April 2014, barrel bombs killed 25 students at a school in opposition-held Douma near Aleppo. This has forced Syria’s teachers to turn trailers, poultry farms, and other unusual terrains into classrooms in the war-torn country where more than two million children remain out of school.

More photos at Foreign Affairs; go look.


Gold Star Mothers Day, 2015

September 27, 2015

President Barack Obama hugs Gold Star mother Michelle DeFord following a roundtable with veterans and Gold Star mothers regarding the Iran nuclear agreement, in the Roosevelt Room of the White House, Sept. 10, 2015. Secretary of State John Kerry also participated. (Official White House Photo by Pete Souza)

President Barack Obama hugs Gold Star mother Michelle DeFord following a roundtable with veterans and Gold Star mothers regarding the Iran nuclear agreement, in the Roosevelt Room of the White House, Sept. 10, 2015. Secretary of State John Kerry also participated. (Official White House Photo by Pete Souza)

Ceremonies and gatherings mark Gold Star Mothers Day in cities across the United States. Gold Star Mothers Day officially is the last Sunday in September, September 27 in 2015.

The Tampa Tribune offers an article covering several meetings in the Tampa area, and the families honored and affected.

Photo and caption from the Tampa Tribune: Thea Kurz became a Gold Star mother on Aug. 20, 2014, when her son, Army Sgt. 1st Class Matthew Leggett, 39, was killed in Afghanistan. She says she gets helpful support from other Tampa Bay families who have lost loved ones serving in the military.

Photo and caption from the Tampa Tribune: Thea Kurz became a Gold Star mother on Aug. 20, 2014, when her son, Army Sgt. 1st Class Matthew Leggett, 39, was killed in Afghanistan. She says she gets helpful support from other Tampa Bay families who have lost loved ones serving in the military.

Photo and caption from the Emporia (Kansas) Gazette: Kendra Johnson/Gazette Maria Lane holds her son's dog tags on Tuesday. These were the dog tags David was wearing when he passed and Lane has since worn them everyday in memory of him.

Photo and caption from the Emporia (Kansas) Gazette:  Maria Lane holds her son’s dog tags on Tuesday. These were the dog tags David was wearing when he passed and Lane has since worn them everyday in memory of him. Photo: Kendra Johnson/Gazette

 


Gold Star Mothers Day 2015 – fly your flag today, September 27

September 27, 2015

Fly your U.S. flag on September 27, 2015, in honor of the Gold Star Mothers of fallen U.S. soldiers.

Gold Star mother Jennifer Owens views a photo of her daughter Spc. Ember Marie Alt at the Survivor Outreach Services Remembrance Hall in Fort Hood, Texas. Owens credits Survivor Outreach Services staff members for helping her cope with her loss of her daughter. U.S. Army photo

‘Gold Star Mothers’ become bedrocks of support for survivors of the fallen’: Gold Star mother Jennifer Owens views a photo of her daughter Spc. Ember Marie Alt at the Survivor Outreach Services Remembrance Hall in Fort Hood, Texas. Owens credits Survivor Outreach Services staff members for helping her cope with her loss of her daughter. U.S. Army photo and caption

Gold Star Mothers Day is the last Sunday in September, designated under U.S. law, 36 U.S.C. §111:

The President is requested to issue a proclamation calling on United States Government officials to display the flag of the United States on all Government buildings, and the people of the United States to display the flag and hold appropriate meetings at homes, churches, or other suitable places, on Gold Star Mother’s Day as a public expression of the love, sorrow, and reverence of the people for Gold Star Mothers.

Gold Star Mothers grew out of the grief and charity of mothers of soldiers who died in World War I, gaining formal organization in 1928.

The American Gold Star Mothers Inc. was formed in the United States shortly after World War I to provide support for mothers who lost sons or daughters in the war. The name came from the custom of families of servicemen hanging a banner called a Service Flag in the window of their homes. The Service Flag had a star for each family member in the United States Armed Forces. Living servicemen were represented by a blue star, and those who had lost their lives were represented by a gold star. Gold Star Mothers are often socially active but are non-political. Today, membership in the Gold Star Mothers is open to any American woman who has lost a son or daughter in service to the United States. On the last Sunday in September, Gold Star Mother’s Day is observed in the U.S. in their honor.[1] The group holds a congressional charter under Title 36 of the United States Code.

Proclamation from President Obama for Gold Star Mothers Day, 2015:

Presidential Proclamation — Gold Star Mother’s and Family’s Day, 2015

GOLD STAR MOTHER’S AND FAMILY’S DAY, 2015

– – – – – – –

BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, A PROCLAMATION

At every crossroads in the American story, courageous individuals of all backgrounds and beliefs have answered our Nation’s call to serve.  Today, the sacrifices of our fallen heroes echo in safer towns and cities, countries and continents — resonating throughout a world they forever made freer.  Their legacies are solemnly enshrined in the history of our eternally grateful Nation, as well as in the hearts of all who loved them.  Today, we honor the Gold Star Mothers and Families who carry forward the memories of those willing to lay down their lives for the United States and the liberties for which we stand.

The proud patriots of our Armed Forces never serve alone.  Standing with each service member are parents, spouses, children, siblings, and friends, providing support and love and helping uphold the ideals that bind our Nation together.  While most Americans may never fully comprehend the price paid by those who gave their last full measure of devotion, families of the fallen know it intimately and without end.  Their sleepless nights allow for our peaceful rest, and the folded flags they hold dear are what enable ours to wave.  The depth of their sorrow is immeasurable, and we are forever indebted to them for all they have given for us.

Despite their broken hearts, the families of these warriors are full of love and they continue to serve their communities and comfort our troops, veterans, and other military families. Our country is constantly inspired by their incredible resilience, and in their example we see the very best of America.  On this day of remembrance, we honor our Gold Star Mothers and Families by living fully the freedom for which they have given so much, and by rededicating ourselves to our enduring obligation to serve them as well as they have served us.

The Congress, by Senate Joint Resolution 115 of June 23, 1936 (49 Stat. 1985 as amended), has designated the last Sunday in September as “Gold Star Mother’s Day.”

NOW, THEREFORE, I, BARACK OBAMA, President of the United States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution and the laws of the United States, do hereby proclaim September 27, 2015, as Gold Star Mother’s and Family’s Day.  I call upon all Government officials to display the flag of the United States over Government buildings on this special day.  I also encourage the American people to display the flag and hold appropriate ceremonies as a public expression of our Nation’s gratitude and respect for our Gold Star Mothers and Families.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this twenty-fourth day of September, in the year of our Lord two thousand fifteen, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and fortieth.

BARACK OBAMA

Here is a series of short videos on Gold Star Mothers, Gold Star Parents, and even notes on Veterans Benefits available to survivors of soldiers lost in conflict.

From Montana's Daily Interlake: Sgt. Chuck Lewis, U.S. Marine Corps, of Ronan folds the American Flag at the Gold Star Mother's Day event at Brockman Park in Ronan on Sunday, September 28 (2013). (Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake)

From Montana’s Daily Interlake: Sgt. Chuck Lewis, U.S. Marine Corps, of Ronan [Montana] folds the American Flag at the Gold Star Mother’s Day event at Brockman Park in Ronan on Sunday, September 28 (2013). (Photo by Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake)

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August 6: Hiroshima atomic bomb, 69 years ago today

August 6, 2014

[Still true, from last year, with minor edits.]

A-Bomb Dome in Hiroshima, Japan

A-Bomb Dome in Hiroshima, Japan Wikipedia image

As a Utah Downwinder, I fight depressing ideas every August 6, and August 9.

The first atomic bomb used in war was dropped by my nation on August 6, 1945.  The second, on August 9.  Hiroshima, then Nagasaki, were the targets.

I know the arguments, both ways.  I feel certain my Uncle Leo B. Stewart’s life was saved by the bombs — and the lives of probably two or three million more Americans, and five or ten million Japanese.  And still I am troubled.

I’m troubled that there seems to be so little attention paid to the anniversary in the U.S.  Year by year, it gets tougher to get news out of remembrance ceremonies in Japan.  Here are some Twitter notes on the day.  I may be back with more, later.

This comes from a pseudo-Truman, but it’s an accurate reflection of the angst Truman went through; once he made the decision, he did not have doubts that it was the right one.

Fortunately, in 68 years since, no other nuclear device has ever been used in war. May we have a planet that never sees their use in war, again.

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This is an encore post.

This is an encore post.


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