A religious bias against good education?


One might be too stunned to shake one’s head; this is a description for a high school calculus course:

CALCULUS
Students will examine the nature of God as they progress in their understanding of mathematics. Students will understand the absolute consistency of mathematical principles and know that God was the inventor of that consistency. Mathematical study will result in a greater appreciation of God and His works in creation. The students will understand the basic ideas of both differential and integral calculus and its importance and historical applications. The students will recognize that God created our minds to be able to see that the universe can be calculated by mental methods.

No, I’m not kidding. It’s from Castle Hills First Baptist School in San Antonio, Texas.

The scientist who sent me the link called it “God’s math.” Architect Mies van der Rohe once said, “God is in the details.” But he didn’t mean that math should be taught as anything other than mathematics. He didn’t mean that any religion should be inserted into math classes — and frankly, that’s a little worrying to me. I speak regularly with theologians who read the same text and come up with radically different descriptions of what it means, sometimes diametrically opposite descriptions.

The social studies curricula are more troubling. What is described is at best second-rate course work. One hopes that the teachers teach the material instead of these descriptions:

SOCIAL STUDIES/HISTORY

WORLD HISTORY I
NINTH GRADE
The students will examine the nature of God as revealed through the study of social studies. Students will develop convictions about God’s word as it relates to world history and will define their responses to it. Through the study of world history, students will develop an understanding of the economic, social, political and cultural developments of our world, as they compare countries and civilizations, Students will learn and acquire an appreciation for God’s relations throughout the timeline of world events. The integration of literature into studies of ancient civilizations will enhance and inspire their learning process. Students will develop attitudes, values, and skills as they discover their place in the world. Students will analyze, synthesize and evaluate social studies skills, including social relationships such as family and church.

WORLD HISTORY II
TENTH GRADE
The students will examine the nature of God as revealed through the study of social studies. Students will develop convictions about God’s word as it relates to world history and will define their responses to it. Through the study of world history, students will develop an understanding of the economic, social, political and cultural developments of our world, as they compare countries and civilizations since the Reformation. Students will learn and acquire an appreciation for God’s relations throughout the timeline of world events. The integration of literature into the studies of modern civilizations will enhance and inspire their learning process. Students will develop attitudes, values, and skills as they discover their place in the world. Students will analyze, synthesize and evaluate social studies skills, including social relationships such as family and church.


AMERICAN HISTORY
ELEVENTH GRADE
Students will evaluate the past and learn from its lessons (I Corinthians 10:11), and become effectual Christians who understand “the times” (I Chronicles 12:32). Students will study the history of our country beginning with the Civil War with a biblically integrated filter as they examine the political, social, and economic perspectives. An emphasis will be placed on the major wars, the industrial revolution, and the settlement of the frontier, requiring students to critically analyze the cause and effect relationships of events in history.

GOVERNMENT/CIVICS
TWELFTH GRADE
Students will evaluate the past and learn from its lessons (I Corinthians 10:11), and become effectual Christians who understand “the times” (I Chronicles 12:32). Students will study the foundational documents of our founding Fathers built upon as they formulated the ideals upon which our country was established. Such documents include: The Magna Carta, The English Bill of Rights of 1689, and the Mayflower Compact. Students are equipped with an understanding of the basic principles contained in these documents, and are able to identify their dependence upon biblical and Reformation principles, leading them to an understanding why the American system is meant for a religious people.

ECONOMICS/FREE ENTERPRISE
TWELFTH GRADE

Students will evaluate the past and learn from its lessons (I Corinthians 10:11), and become effectual Christians who understand “the times” (I Chronicles 12:32). Students will gain an understanding of the workings of economic systems, being able to identify the strengths and weaknesses inherent in capitalism (Deuteronomy 8, 15, 28, Leviticus 25), and the reasons for its superiority to the models of communism and socialism (Ezekiel 46:18).

The last description there, for economics, might lead one to understand this school ignores most of the lessons of Jesus, and especially the stories of the disciples in the immediate aftermath of the crucifixion as described in Acts 2. Not only are the courses described inadequate (we hope the teachers teach the state standards instead, at least), where scripture is specifically mentioned, they appear to be tortured to fit the agenda.

Then comes the choker:

SCIENCE

BIOLOGY

Students will study the physical life of God’s creation. They will continue to develop skills in the use of the scientific method. The students will learn methods and techniques of scientific study, general attributes of the cell and its processes, characteristics of the wide spectrum of living organisms, the classification, similarities and differences of the five kingdoms, evolutionary models and the creation model, the mechanics of inheritance, disease and disorders, and the workings of the human body. Students will gain experience in manipulating the conditions of a laboratory investigation and in evaluating the applications of biological principles in everyday life.

There is no “creation model” that is scientific, nor is there one that conflicts with evolution and is also Biblical. What, in God’s name, are they teaching?

CHFB School was established over 25 years ago, and claims to have more than 300 students enrolled, K-12. Surely there is a track record to look at.

Anybody know what the actual curricula look like at this school? Are there any measures to suggest the school teaches real subjects instead of what is described?

What was the Texas legislature thinking when they authorized Bible classes? Isn’t this bad enough as it is?

____________________

Update: See parent and student comments and ratings of the school, here.

____________________

Update, August 11:  Blogs4Brownback endorses the curriculum — if you do not fully realize the significance of that particular endorsement, study this post, and this one.  Parody?  I asked Brownback’s campaign about the site — they have not disowned it.  As Dave Barry often wrote, I could not make this stuff up.

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72 Responses to A religious bias against good education?

  1. Charles says:

    Right now the school has a “vision” program going on, which is entitled “Charting a New Course.” Now, if someone is charting a new course, that’s an admission they’ve been on the wrong one.

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  2. [...] 9.A religious bias against good education? « Millard Fillmore’s Encore post: A religious bias against good education? « Millard Fillmore’s Bathtub Says: June 1, 2008 at 6:05 am … [...] bias against good education, at Texas Education Agency The religious bias against good education we noted here appears to have exploded into the Texas Education Agency. Unfortunately, there is an… http://timpanogos.wordpress.com/2007/08/08/a-religious-bias-against-education-standards/ [...]

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  3. Nick Kelsier says:

    Morgan says:
    I am in this class and my teacher is amazing. We are one year ahead of all public schools in texas. Calculus is a senior level class but my whole junior class takes it.

    Funny…in my school in Minnesota calculus is a sophmore and a junior level class.

    Oh…that would be a public school by the way.

    Morgan writes:
    By far the best thing about my school is that we can sit together in lunch or advisory (free period) and talk about the wonderful things God has done in our lives.

    Oops..that could also happen in my public school’s lunch period.

    Morgan writes:
    For those of you who are atheists or dont believe in God or believe the “existence of a Creator has remained underwhelming” my heart just goes out to yall. It makes my stomach turn knowing that you are lost. Feel free to ask me any questions.

    Keep in mind I say this as a Christian. Do you have any idea whatsoever how completely insulting you were being Morgan? Do you honestly think, as a Christian, you are going to get people to convert by insulting them and saying they’re lost? From one Christian to another, Morgan, you were being a very poor representative of Christ.

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  4. Charles says:

    I heard the current head of schools, Hubert Hartzler, giving a little talk revealing just how ignorant he is of basic science. He will not tolerate anything that does not fit his Creationist dogma. The irony was that his remarks were delivered prior to a science fair awards ceremony. He asserted that cats and other carnivores did not eat meat before sin came into the world, that there is no reasonable explanation for fossil fish on mountain tops other than the Flood of Noah, that dinosaurs were simply lizards that grew large by virtue of having been shielded from cosmic rays by the “water canopy,” and that just 19 miles beneath our feet there is molten rock at 24,000 degrees.

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  5. Ed Darrell says:

    If the courses are not as described, what do you think about the misrepresentation of the course?

    What could possibly be the godly motivation to describe a calculus course as described by the school, and why would they misdescribe it?

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  6. morgan says:

    okay, let me start off by saying that i do attend this high school and it is NOTHING like the description. I am currently a junior. After reading the description of all the classes i sort of got a cult vibe from it all. Class is not like that at all. I have read many concerns on academics. Lets start with calculus. I am in this class and my teacher is amazing. We are one year ahead of all public schools in texas. Calculus is a senior level class but my whole junior class takes it. The class is centered around math, everyday we come to class and learn a new lesson and continue in each section of the book. What we dont do is come into class and talk about God and the bible the whole hour. Academics are perfectly fine at my school, if you dont believe me ill get my classes average psat score, it is far above average. I will admit that athletics are lacking. I play varsity golf and soccer, we dont necessarily win every soccer match but we try our hardest and have a fun time. By far the best thing about my school is that we can sit together in lunch or advisory (free period) and talk about the wonderful things God has done in our lives. I am going to be spending the summer in China serving my purpose in life and the ability that i have to talk to my friends about it and have their support is amazing. how many public schools do you think that happens at? but that is only when your not being ridiculed in the halls for being a christian. Every Wednesday we have chapel where a speaker comes and shares a message aimed at our age group. Another thing is having christian teachers who are very qualified to teach. its great to have a teacher who can council you in a Godly way if you are having a problem. My spanish teacher and advisor is a great example. When a girl in my class was talking to me about having problems with another teacher and obeying her authorities, my teacher pulled her aside and showed her bible verses to show her what God wants us to do in that situation. For those of you who are atheists or dont believe in God or believe the “existence of a Creator has remained underwhelming” my heart just goes out to yall. It makes my stomach turn knowing that you are lost. Feel free to ask me any questions.

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  7. [...] Watch out.  Creationists appear to be targeting mathematics, in addition to their misaimed criticisms of biology.  You remember the “God centered” math courses at Castle Hills First Baptist School, in Sa…. [...]

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  8. Ediacaran says:

    Kevin and Kim seem to be spreading the lies of creationist Jonathan Wells, as propagated by creationist author Lee Strobel. Here’s a short response from a site dedicated to debunking creationist claims; in this case, the creationist claim they label as CB026:

    “Claim CB026:
    Miller-Urey type experiments produce toxic chemicals, such as cyanide and formaldehyde, but not amino acids.
    Source:
    Discovery Institute. 2003. A preliminary analysis of the treatment of evolution in biology textbooks currently being considered for adoption by the Texas State Board of Education. http://www.discovery.org/articleFiles/PDFs/TexasPrelim.pdf, p. 5.
    Response:
    Cyanide and formaldehyde are necessary building blocks for important biochemical compounds, including amino acids (Abelson 1996). They are not toxins in this context.

    Miller-Urey experiments produce amino acids among other chemical compounds (Kawamoto and Akaboshi 1982; Schlesinger and Miller 1983).
    References:
    Abelson, P. 1996. Chemical events on the primitive earth. Proceedings of the National Academy of Science USA 55: 1365-1372.
    Kawamoto, K. and M. Akaboshi. 1982. Study on the chemical evolution of low molecular weight compounds in a highly oxidized atmosphere using electric discharges. Origins of Life 12(2): 133-141.
    Schlesinger, G. and S. L. Miller. 1983. Prebiotic synthesis in atmospheres containing CH4, CO, and CO2. I. Amino acids. Journal of Molecular Evolution 19(5): 376-382.
    Further Reading:
    Ellington, Andrew D. and Matthew Levy. 2003. Gas, discharge, and the Discovery Institute. Reports of the National Center for Science Education 23(3-4): 39-40.”

    Kim and Kevin, how about you cite your sources, other than a vague reference to “my professor at MIT”? Got some names and publications from peer-reviewed journals to go with those statments?

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  9. Ed Darrell says:

    Big Bang: We don’t know whether tweaking any of the laws of physics would result in an uninhabitable universe — we don’t know whether it would be possible to do such tweaking in any case. What we have is the universe we have. Is that mere existence an argument for deity? We can’t tell — what else is possible by chance? What “famous scientist” argues gravity can only exist as it is? Is she ashamed to put a name to her words?

    Miller-Urey experiments: But, if you add oxygen, you still get amino acids and other complex carbohydrates necessary for life. In fact, the experiment has been repeated with a rather wide variety of atmosphere possibilities, and essential life chemicals and amino acids result in every case. Oxygen alone does not prevent it from functioning — it skews the products to one side. Formaldehyde and cyanide can result, but it’s incorrect to say they were the results of his experiments. Cyanide, by the way, could be called one of those essential chemicals.

    DNA is not “too complicated” to result from chance. It’s not what scientists claim, but let’s be fair. On the other hand, RNA, which replicates itself and can make other forms of RNA, the precursors of DNA, will arise spontaneously.

    None of which makes religion and science compatible. Though Francis Collins maintains his faith despite his understanding of evolution, Kenyon denies most science in his rush to try to make things compatible. That’s not really a reconciliation.

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  10. Kevin says:

    Kim is 100% correct. And please, before anyone accuses me of “embarrassing my school,” with incorrect or “unscientific” data, I’ll tell you that I got my info straight from my professor at MIT…

    1) Big bang theory is actually more creationist than it ever has been. According to scientists, the odds of this universe existing in any habitable form are virtually nil. Pretty much, if you tweak ANY of the physics, the whole universe will alternately immediately collapse, be scattered into fine dust, possess no elements heavier than helium, or just be generally inhabitable, depending on what you do. As one famous scientist has put it, “The odds of gravity alone functioning to make the universe habitable are about the same as an astronaut hitting the nucleus of an atom from space with a dart”

    2) Miller’s experiment is inconclusive on very, very many levels. For one thing, the addition of oxygen (now believed to exist on earth during that time period), prevents his experiment from functioning. For another, the “organic molecules” he created are formaldehyde and cyanide. In their most benevolent form, they make embalming fluid. In raw state, they are incredibly toxic. For a third, even if his acid structures could exist, scientists cannot tell how they could come together in such a manner as to even remotely resemble the complexity of even the simplest strand of DNA. In short, DNA is far too complicated to have originated by chance.

    So I’d hardly say science and religion are incompatable. If they were, someone better have a pretty darn good explanation as to why such scientists as Francis Collins, Allan Sandage, Owen Gingerich, Dean Kenyon, and others can be religious.

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  11. [...] From August 8, 2007, the post that exposed the educationally-destructive, religiously-drenched mathematics curriculum from Castle Hills First Baptist School in San Antonio, Texas. [...]

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  12. [...] geography: A world of stupidity If you had thought the God-centered math courses first exposed in the Bathtub to be the apex of Christian of religious folly, sit down; buckle up. Take a deep [...]

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  13. Katie says:

    I am actually a former student of this school. And believe me….it’s not quite as bad as it sounds but close. However, I made excellent scores on the ACT and SAT, and I am doing well in college. (NOT a Christian college btw) Probably the only good thing CHS taught me was to be able to BS my way out of anything because of all of the Biblical applications they made us do.

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  14. [...] bias against good education, at Texas Education Agency The religious bias against good education we noted here appears to have exploded into the Texas Education Agency. Unfortunately, there is an ugly political [...]

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  15. Victim of the Castle says:

    I SURVIVED CASTLE HILLS FIRST BAPTIST SCHOOL!!!!!!!!! Yes, it is time for us to come forward to let the world know what an awful place this was. I went to this school K-12 grade. Yep. At the time, I didn’t realize that it was awful.

    Then I went to college at a small, liberal arts university. Thank something. I am currently enrolled in a doctorate program at Columbia. NO thanks to CHFB though.

    As for the curriculum, its all true. Class is HIGHLY sensored. Questions (especially when asked during Bible class) that contradict the teachers lessons are dismissed. The “science” is so ridiculously absurd that a fortunate majority of the students recognize it as nonsense. Example: dinosaurs and people lived together, radio carbon dating is a conspiracy created by scientists to get people to stop believing in god, the reason dinosaurs are extinct is because of the flood of Noah. Oh, and AIDS was created by god to punish homosexuals. All of this was printed in the textbooks (courtesy of Liberty University press).

    There is no mention of Godel, nor of anything current in terms of scientific breakthrough. And, you would think they could at least teach ABOUT evolution in some kind of attempt to dismiss it. Nope. Not mentioned at all. And yes, it is actually taught, in class, that the earth is 6,000 years old.

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  16. [...] of the old scrub brush to Pharyngula, whose note on this blog’s original posting of the curricula from Castle Hills First Baptist School is probably what got the attention of Dr. Paulos in the [...]

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  17. Pam says:

    Swift Report had an item similar to this, August 2005

    Math for Believers: ‘Deometry’ is Hot Subject for Fall

    Forget about isosceles triangles and the Pythagorean Theorem—they’re square. The hottest trend in high-school math these days is deometry, the study of how the Creator created points, lines, angles, shapes and proofs. While critics decry the entry of religion into math class, fans of the new teaching method maintain that by giving God a primary role in geometry and other fields of mathematics, they are merely restoring balance to an area that has sought to remove all vestiges of religion from the public polygon.

    Continue reading “Math for Believers: ‘Deometry’ is Hot Subject for Fall ”

    http://swiftreport.blogs.com/news/2005/08/math_for_believ.html

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  18. [...] to fit a fundagelical vision. I’ve heard of inserting God into biology, obviously, but the description of godly calculus has got to be seen to be believed. And history is apparently the study of the nature of god as [...]

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  19. [...] God’s calculus? One might be too stunned to shake one’s head; this is a description for a high school calculus course: [...]

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  20. [...] A religious bias against good education? One might be too stunned to shake one’s head; this is a description for a high school calculus […] [...]

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  21. [...] A religious bias against good education? One might be too stunned to shake one’s head; this is a description for a high school calculus […] [...]

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  22. Don Cox says:

    “As far as I know, no one practices pharmaceudical or clinical sociology on people. Sociology is the study of the structure of society, not the practice of using that information to change or influence society.”

    Unfortunately many politicians have used half-understood ideas from sociology to try to change society. That particularly applies to Marxists, but also to Law-and-Order enthusiasts of various kinds.

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  23. mcclaud says:

    Crazypastor -

    I’m not really bagging on all religious people as a whole. I was trying to make a point by finishing up my comment with a statement similar to the kind he used.

    Really, though, people should be more aware of two fields of study before making a comment about how they can effect a life. I mean, to me, it sounded like he was looking for an excuse for being “messed up.”

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  24. Debi says:

    Thank you, I enjoyed reading everything. You all make interesting points and I believe it all boils down to what each individual considers to be important in there academic life and their personal life. As we have read some people think both areas are one in the same. I’m ok with that!

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  25. Ed Darrell says:

    Which part of evolution is it that you think would be so difficult, pastor? Did you see the list of evolution sources posted in answer to kim, above?

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  26. Paul & Freethinker… The evidence for God is overwhelming to me, while belief in current evolutionary theory requires me to set my brain aside and not ask questions. However, if anyone can prove how life evolved to this state in a mere 13.6 billion years, I’d be happy to prove God exists.

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  27. [...] A religious bias against good higher education — in theology! Some religious primary and secondary schools stand on the same, treacherous ground when it comes to curricula which deserve challenging. Castle Hills First Baptist School is not the only educational institution damning children with fool…. [...]

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  28. Binkyboy says:

    Hey Kim, you really shouldn’t be a biochem major. No, really. You obviously haven’t studied the recent findings that asteroids are made up of highly dense methane, which lends credibility to Miller’s theory.

    You also seem to have the big-bang theory mixed up with the sudden pre-Cambian explosion of mammalian forms, but you don’t recognize that mammals existed prior to that explosion.

    Evolutionists have decried Henkel’s diagrams of embryonics for years.

    Please catch up with the arguments of today before you attempt to debate evolution again or you’ll only embarrass yourself and your school further.

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  29. Ed Darrell says:

    On another blog, a fellow complained that his education in a Catholic school wasn’t close to brainwashing. I gather he thinks I’m being unfair.

    Here is what I said (with typos and phrasing corrected):

    Catholic schools have a strong commitment to strong academics. Especially in the U.S., they come out of a tradition that says the best defense of religious freedom, the best way to have a good life and live it, is to learn as much as possible. Academics are front and center in Catholic schools — because, most Catholics believe, such striving for excellence is a way to honor God.

    Consequently, the calculus class descriptions in Catholic schools talk seriously about calculus. They are not fluff documents designed to make a surface appearance that they are godly — they are loaded with respect for the subject, for education.

    The class descriptions for the school in San Antonio show little awareness for the class subject material. They are dilettante documents.

    Here’s the description for calculus at Pope John-Paul II High School in Tennessee:

    Calculus: (1 credit)

    Calculus AB and Calculus BC are primarily concerned with developing the students’ understanding of the concepts of calculus and providing experiences with its methods and applications. These courses emphasize a multi-representational approach to calculus, with concepts, results, and problems being expressed graphically, numerically, analytically, and verbally. The connections between these representations are vital to the successful understanding of calculus. Calculus BC is an extension of Calculus AB rather than an enhancement. Common topics require similar depth of understanding and both courses are intended to be challenging and demanding. Through the use of unifying themes of derivative, integral, limits, and approximation, and applications and modeling, both courses become a cohesive whole rather than a collection of unrelated topics.

    Go to the website and look at the math program at Pope J-P II, how it’s integrated from start to finish. Notice the AP classes — not offered at Castle Hills FB School in San Antonio. Notice that, while no rational person would assume that Pope John-Paul II High School administrators, teachers, or educational experiences are without God, there is a strong focus on the actual subject matter.
    http://www.jp2hs.org/page.cfm?p=38

    The social studies curriculum, at Castle Hills FB school, strongly hints that they ignore the facts of history to propagandize. The biology curriculum statement announces boldly that they depart from science.

    That’s not the road to good academics, nor to good citizens from the students enrolled.

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  30. Kyle Wise says:

    OK, do your research on this school in Texas. How well do they score on the SAT? How do those scores compare to the other schools in the state?

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  31. kckc says:

    Frecklecassie: the bible is a historical accounting of a nation of people and their religious beliefs. Many of the ‘stories’ found in the bible can be backed up with other historical literatures. So how can you say that its not REAL? Unless you’ve been part of such an upbringing and been part of such a curriculum – you can’t judge it as UNREAL. Pick up their school books, leaf thru them… and then decide if its REAL history or REAL science infused with their religious beliefs.

    We are so quick to judge/condemn others for what doesn’t work for you/us as individuals. If these students are getting an education providing with at a min the basics required while learning to LOVE THY NEIGHBOUR and to be good citizens… again I ask WHY NOT? We are all free to pursue further education and to expand our belief system… so to say that they are being robbed of a REAL education is not an accurate statement. Many of our public, non-denominational students are lacking in proper education…. growing up with far less social graces and understanding than those who could possibly attend such a school.

    We have free will to believe what we choose… despite what is taught in Churches and school. We have enough resources at our finger tips to educate ourselves if seeking more understanding.

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  32. bilfred says:

    I see that this church fully approves of the concept of a madrassa. They might even pick up a few good ideas if some of their members toured Pakistan’s educational ‘system’.

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  33. After administering one of the net’s larger religious forums for two years, the evidence I’ve seen for the existence of a Creator has remained underwhelming.

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  34. Freethinker says:

    Kim says: there is evidence that a creator exists
    Now then, would you mind producing any evidence for that ?

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  35. Matt says:

    Oh dear … that curriculum is horribly twisted to the point of clearly educating students in complete and utter lies and falsehoods. That is not education, that is indoctrination.

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  36. Ed Darrell says:

    But Kim, instead of going “on and on,” pause for a few minutes and get some facts.

    Start here, at UC-Berkeley: http://evolution.berkeley.edu/

    Spend some time with this book, from the National Academy of Sciences:
    http://www.nap.edu/html/creationism/origin.html — noodle around to read about the topics you’ve mentioned.

    Study about Haeckel here:
    http://www.talkorigins.org/indexcc/CB/CB701.html, and here:
    http://www.talkorigins.org/indexcc/CB/CB701_1.html

    Study about the Miller/Urey experiments here:
    http://www.talkorigins.org/indexcc/CB/CB035.html, and here:
    http://www.talkorigins.org/indexcc/CB/CB035_3.html, and here:
    http://www.chem.duke.edu/~jds/cruise_chem/Exobiology/miller.html, and here:
    http://www.natcenscied.org/icons/icon1millerurey.html

    Read about thermodynamics here:
    http://www.talkorigins.org/faqs/thermo.html, and here:
    http://nobelprize.org/nobel_prizes/chemistry/laureates/1977/press.html (noodle around the Nobel site and get famliar with Prigogine’s work; his Nobel was for his work that found order rises spontaneously because of the laws of thermodynamics).

    Fossils are everywhere, but take a look at this paper:
    http://www.edwardtbabinski.us/whales/evolution_of_whales/

    There! You should feel much better now.

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  37. kim says:

    okay, the descriptions of courses are pretty funny…
    BUT in all fairness, there are multiple flaws in “big bang”/ evolution theory. take my word, i’m a biochemistry graduate student. where to start?
    Specifically, the Miller experiment invented in the 1950s where they “reproduce” the earth’s primitive atmosphere, zap it with electric current to produce amino acids. In the ’70s, scientists refuted the atmosphere saying that it was probably nothing like the original atmosphere.. and when you do zap the atmosphere combo he provided you do get organic molecules… cyanide and formaldehyde! Embalming fluid!
    Haeckel’s embryos.. where the diagrams of the various embryos are all similar thus deducing a common ancestor. Also negated. Huge controversy(back in 1860, mind you. there have been huge advances in technology since then). Haeckel specifically chose a salamander rather than a frog for the amphibian representative b/c frogs are completely different. Not to mention most of the replications were imposters! Haeckel in his exhaustion or rather laziness just used the same woodcut in the embryo sketches b/c he was so confident that all the embryos looked the same.
    Where are all the links to the fossils? If we have such macro-evolution, there are perhaps thousands of stages to macro-evolution.. where are these fossils?
    How do we explain being created from primordial ooze and having unexplainable traits like emotions, a concept of love and selflessness… things that don’t just happen from carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, hydrogen, et al reacting within our bodies?
    How come every people group in the earth over has an innate sense that killing another human being is wrong?
    If we live by science and believe in entropy, a state of spontaneous chemical and physical change, that everything moves from order to an increased state of disorder/chaos, then how could the universal evolve from primitive to organized?
    i can go on and on and on. there is evidence that a creator exists and evidence that a creator doesn’t exist, but everyone has to examine it for themselves unbiasedly and take a step of faith in one direction or the other. Everyone has faith in something, what do you have faith in?

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  38. Harvard and all of the early institutions of higher learning included in God and theology in their coursework. You guys would be dismayed to know how many high ranking scientists and educators still believe God had a big hand in creating the place. I think we’ll survive.

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  39. Mcclaud, if you’re going to make the point (a good one) that going to a psychiatrist exposes someone to merely “one tiny part of psychology as a whole,” then why turn around and seemingly generalize against people who go to God? If one generalization is unfair, I’m sure another is. If you didn’t mean it that way, I apologize.

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  40. mcclaud says:

    What’s funny is that if Tom actually understood what Psychology is, he’d probably realize that by going to a PSYCHIATRIST (I’m guessing on this), he was only subjected to one tiny part of psychology as a whole. Look, Freud is not exactly the most reputable personage in psychology as a whole, so they have an entire science dedicated to the teachings of him and his offshoots called Psychiatry. Don’t worry – the rest of us psychologists aren’t going to say you are in love with your mother and that you have pen15 envy.

    I’m still trying to figure out WTF he meant by Sociology screwing him up. As far as I know, no one practices pharmaceudical or clinical sociology on people. Sociology is the study of the structure of society, not the practice of using that information to change or influence society.

    This is what happens when you become jaded by experience and run to God, closing your mind in the process to what is reality.

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  41. smilingchaos says:

    This seems to be both political and religious propoganda to the school and to certain political parties. I can understand how it would teach about god but What the F—!!

    If they wanted to teach science and human development without it clashing with their religious beliefs, they could say it is a theory and all theorys can be debated. In fact on another note. Poeple need to understand what a theory is.

    Like this

  42. [...] A religious bias against good education? One might be too stunned to shake one’s head; this is a description for a high school calculus […] [...]

    Like this

  43. 06jk says:

    I Told You So: I gotta agree with you… and awesome point on survival of the fittest. Adaptation is another theory Darwin studied that proves true with that persecution statement.

    And Tom, you’re ruining it for us level-headed Christians that are trying to be taken seriously! STOP!

    Sheesh.

    Like this

  44. I Told You So says:

    Tom Says: “Creation. Evolution is the biggest joke and lie to ever be foisted onto our intellectual community.”

    -The intellectual community? This guy is hilarious!!

    Tom Says: “There are some subjects that I do not favor in any education including public and private, they are Sociology of any kind and Psychology of any kind they have screwed up more people then I can count”

    - Stop it Tom! You’re killing me!

    Tom Says: “You people would really be more happy I am quiet sure if all Christians were just put to death. Then we would no longer be any bother to the likes of your types. However, one warning historically Christians have multiplied the greatest, when they are under persecution. So if really want more of the same just keep talking and persecuting Christians for their beliefs and I am certain there will then be more of us.”

    -Wait a minute…. Wouldn’t that be proof of survival of the fittest?

    Like this

  45. mark says:

    “Maybe they use it to calculate exactly how many angels can dance on the head of a pin.”

    Clearly that’s a pre-Reformation construct and has no place in Bible-based calculus. Although it’s not explicit in the curriculum it should be understood that papist calculus is of the anti-Christ.

    Like this

  46. Silmarillion says:

    I guess Godel doesn’t get a look-in in the mathematics curriculum then!

    Like this

  47. Hank Roberts says:

    I think someone’s spoofing the school review site.

    “I have great morals thanks to CHS but academics
    could improve and there is few athletics.”

    Got grammar?

    Like this

  48. Bob says:

    The high school I went to was X-tian. I took theology classes every year. I also had what would be AP biology, complete with the theory of natural selection. That was thirty years ago.

    Evidently in the intervening years television theology has become endemic. Too bad these people feel their faith challenged by the world around them. Television education, television culture, television taste. Information tailored for the ignorant masses by people like Tom Delay.

    If their education had included good theology, good history, and good science they wouldn’t be wasting other people’s time with this incessant bleating. Texas must be an intellectual black hole. God forgive them for voting for Tom Delay. They show no awareness of the evil perpetrated by their representatives in Congress. And now their idiotic governor has appointed a commissioner of education who wants to get rid of science and replace it with superstition.

    Like this

  49. Jim A. says:

    TOM: Oh, I certainly don’t think that the government has any business whatsoever preventing this nonsense. I do however reserve the right to laugh at it. I mean I just can’t top the idea that somehow the nature of God is revealed through the study of Calculus. Maybe they use it to calculate exactly how many angels can dance on the head of a pin.

    Like this

  50. 7zcata says:

    http://www.greatschools.net/cgi-bin/tx/private/8335

    For what its worth, not much info. “Christ centered” education seems to be the only reason to go there. Plenty of other high quality secular schools are in the area.

    Like this

  51. [...] Christian schooling is not brainwashing A Religious Bias Against Education Standards [...]

    Like this

  52. george says:

    “I am a little concerned that anyone would suggest that a Baptist Christian school should be forbidden to teach the part that God has in this world. That includes math and it certainly does include Creation. Evolution is the biggest joke and lie to ever be foisted onto our intellectual community. You people would really be more happy I am quiet sure if all Christians were just put to death. Then we would no longer be any bother to the likes of your types. However, one warning historically Christians have multiplied the greatest, when they are under persecution. So if really want more of the same just keep talking and persecuting Christians for their beliefs and I am certain there will then be more of us. Jesus is the Creator and He is the ultimate one to whom you must give an answer.”

    Amen! I learnt here that God! is great! I was also taught that science stands no chance in the face of God! and to be proud of my white heritage. And even though I wasn’t good in math they passed me because I wrote a report about how math is God!s gift to us to show us how great he is!

    Like this

  53. “why not?”

    Because they need to learn REAL science and REAL history.

    Like this

  54. kckc says:

    I have my own issues with regards to organized religion and the belief in a supreme being called God… but it is after all a First Baptist Church which is the foundation of their education system. People will do anything to bring people back to their faiths and incorporate just about anything into their methods. This is no different I suppose. Before going to a public school system – I went to a Catholic school that did pretty much the same thing… incorporated many aspects of Catholism into mathematical equations while teaching the principles of their faith. Now after a beating from a nunn… it was time to get out of that school, espcially considering it conflicted with my childhood faith. In the end – I knew how to the all the basics required by our Provincial education system and them some – albeit at the expense of Holy Crosses, Sermons, Fishes and detailed accountings of biblical miracles

    I don’t necessarily agree that people should be forced feed a religious views or beliefs (which is why I am no longer a Jehovah’s Witness) but I am also not opposed to school rooted in a religion teaching their faith to its students. There are much worst things out in this world than to teach kids some fundamental basics in spirituality. If it gives people hope in a time of hopelessness… why not?

    Like this

  55. vontos says:

    As someone who went to a Baptist school, I can say that they (at least my school) offer a better education than standard public school classes (honors/advanced classes are often a different story though). When I got to college, I found that I had an average background in math and a better background in history/social studies and in science than most students in my classes.

    When it talks about looking at subjects from God’s perspective or a Christian perspective, all it really means is that the books throw in a Bible verse every once in awhile to show that the Bible is still valid and true today. It really doesn’t affect math at all and affects history very little. Biology is another story, but anyone who is surprised that Creationism is taught in a Christian school doesn’t get out much.

    Like this

  56. Tom says:

    You also can not have it both ways. You cannot support saying that the church can not have any say so in the public welfare and then want to have a say so as to what is taught in a Christian Private school of any kind. I know of no state that has laws that restrict what a private school can teach, only the subject mater that must be covered. There are no restrictions to other material that is a part of private education. There are some subjects that I do not favor in any education including public and private, they are Sociology of any kind and Psychology of any kind they have screwed up more people then I can count, including myself.

    Like this

  57. mysterybea says:

    I went to the link that has ratings and reviews of the school and this was written by a recent graduate now attending Baylor:

    “I have great morals thanks to CHS but academics could improve and there is few athletics.”

    Nice. I think that says it all. I guess if parents send their kids to bible-camp instead of school, they can’t expect much of an education.

    Like this

  58. 06jk says:

    This was an awesome post. I’d like to reply to it in my own blog and place a link back to your entry, if that’s alright.

    Like this

  59. Tom says:

    I am a little concerned that anyone would suggest that a Baptist Christian school should be forbidden to teach the part that God has in this world. That includes math and it certainly does include Creation. Evolution is the biggest joke and lie to ever be foisted onto our intellectual community. You people would really be more happy I am quiet sure if all Christians were just put to death. Then we would no longer be any bother to the likes of your types. However, one warning historically Christians have multiplied the greatest, when they are under persecution. So if really want more of the same just keep talking and persecuting Christians for their beliefs and I am certain there will then be more of us. Jesus is the Creator and He is the ultimate one to whom you must give an answer.

    Like this

  60. Exoscoper says:

    Hey, it’s not a school. The website tells you upfront that it’s “A Ministry of Castle Hills First Baptist Church”. A ministry, not a school. Don’t expect to learn anything that doesn’t derive from their particular religion.

    Like this

  61. Bob says:

    What you guys should be looking at is the ACSI acredidation. From their website:
    “ACSI proudly lists our currently accredited international and national schools outside North America. ACSI accredited schools are also listed at the National Council for Private School Accreditation (NCPSA) website due to ACSI’s recognition as a member of the NCPSA. NCPSA is a full voting member of CITA.”

    Now that’s scary.

    Like this

  62. spudbeach says:

    I’ve got a real problem with the insertion of the “scientific method” into the biology class. To me, as a HS physics teacher, the essence of the scientific method is that the scientist can admit she is wrong. How can a teacher model that while holding out a book as inerrent?

    Like this

  63. Salad Is Slaughter — at least they knew that an adjective is grammar.

    Like this

  64. But just think how easy it would be to write and grade tests! All they have to do is accept some variation of the answer, “It’s God’s will” and the question will be scored as correct. No student should ever have less than a completely correct paper. Let’s look at some examples to see how this would work.

    1. What is 5 + 6
    a) 56
    b) 11
    c) -1
    d) What God wills it to be.

    2. How old is the Earth?
    a) 6000 years
    b) 4,000,000,000 years
    c) No one knows
    d) It’s as old as God wants it to be.

    3. Essay question. Discuss the social and economic issues that led to the Civil War.
    The Civil War started because God willed it to start.

    4. What is an adjective?
    Grammar is subject to God’s law and is unknowable to mere humans.

    How could any of those answers possibly be graded incorrect?

    Like this

  65. elbogz says:

    I took 5 semesters of Calculus in college, and I can only say, it is evil, it is not of God. It is evil. On that same note, just a friendly reminder not to drink alcohol while doing calculus. One should not drink and derive.

    Like this

  66. Ed Darrell says:

    To be fair, U.S. history is divided in Texas — 8th grade takes prehistory through Reconstruction (usually pegged as ending in 1877); 11th grade U.S. history takes it from the Civil War through today, making an assumption that kids forgot about the Civil War between 8th and 11th grades. It’s a valid assumption — I find they usually didn’t learn much else, either. If the school is using one of the standard texts for 11th grade, it will include units reviewing the previous history.

    Alas, that description “U.S. history from the Civil War” is about the only thing in the description that doesn’t scream “crank history.”

    Like this

  67. bernarda says:

    There is this case of a church in South Carolina forcing the closing down of a library summer reading program.

    http://www.librarian.net/stax/2069/summer-reading-program-cancelled-harassing-phone-calls-likened-to-bomb-threats/

    http://www.schoollibraryjournal.com/article/CA6453294.html

    Like this

  68. Sandra says:

    Good to know what is going on in God’s universe!

    Love the reference to Reformation principles in Government/Civics (no pun intended?) and US History beginning with the Civil War? Wow.

    Like this

  69. mpb says:

    Note that GOVERNMENT/CIVICS does not refer to the US Bill of Rights (nor the Virginia Bill of Rights). Maybe because the Bill of Rights undermines the curriculum?

    Like this

  70. Is that a real class description from a real school? AGH!

    Like this

  71. Ellie says:

    I am trying hard to understand what Ezekiel 46:18 has to do with “the models of communism and socialism.” It is a church based school, so I suppose they have the right to teach whatever they choose. Does the state of Texas have standards that church based schools have to meet?

    Like this

  72. Sara says:

    SOMEBODY GET ME OUTTA HEEEEERRRRREEEEE!!!!!

    Like this

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