Race to the Top: What’s a good job for a great bubble-guesser?


Education issues suffered here at the Bathtub over the past several months.  Confession:  I don’t like to write while angry, and thinking about education generally gets me there quickly.  When I write in anger, I like to sit on the stuff and edit when I’m cooled down.  But when I get back to edit, I get angry again.

If you watched the follies from the Texas State Soviet of Education over social studies standards, you might understand some of my anger.  I’m fortunate in some ways that my students don’t track the news more closely — they tended to miss the Soviet’s gutting of Hispanic history from Texas history standards, and so they didn’t get angry.  More than 85% of my students are Hispanic, many related to the Texas heroes dropped from the standards because they were brown (“What’s Hispanic Heritage Month for, anyway?” the Soviet probably wondered.)

Test bubbling, from TweenTeacher

Power of Bubbling -- for a scary story, click on the image and go read it at TweenTeacher

Plus, time for thinking about these issues evaporated during the school year.   Summer isn’t much better, though a bunch of us had eight great days with members of the history department at UT-Arlington focusing on the Gilded Age, Progressive Era, Age of Imperialism . . . even though reminded every day that the Texas Soviet doesn’t want us to teach that period as it is recorded in the history books.  (No, there are not plans for a translation into Texas Soviet Speak, at least not soon.  Teachers will have to make do.)

In one of our (too) many testing/oath-signing sessions this spring, a colleague cynically wondered what would be a good job for a kid who does well on the tests, a kid who has “demonstrated mastery of bubble-guessing.”

Bubble-guessing.  Wow.  Is that an apt description for what many schools teach these days!

I have a few days to put up the periscope and see what is going on out there.  A couple of things I’ve noticed, that you may want to follow:

Yong Zhao noticed that the Race to the Top criteria shouldn’t be etched in stone, and that small changes result in different winners. He’s actually more critical than that — he’s not just saying that the criteria can change.  He’s saying the criteria are lousy.

Education has a new god: data. It is believed to have the power to save American education and thus everything in education must be about data—collect more data about our children, evaluate teachers and administrators based on data, and reward and punish schools using data.

Sound familiar?

Zhao points to serious analyses of the Race to the Top applications and rejections which show, among other things, Pennsylvania was penalized for focusing on early childhood education, instead of collecting data.

Why was it we got into this swamp in the first place, and where did all these alligators come from?

Go read Zhao’s analysis, and maybe cruise around his blog.  It’s worth your while.  He’s a professor at Michigan State — University Distinguished Professor of Education.  (One thing you should read there:  Zhao’s slides from a recent speech.  E-mail the link to your principal.  Somebody find a YouTube version of that speech, please.)  [Checker Finn, do you ever get over to this backwater?  Zhao's on to something.  Zhao's on to a lot of things.]

Race to the Top is the worst thing the Obama administration has done, in my opinion.  It is aimed, or mis-aimed to give us a nation of bubble-guessers.  My guess is that aim is unintentional.  But the road to hell, or a Republican majority . . .

While we’re looking around, pay some attention to David Warlick’s 2¢ worth.  That’s where I found the links to Zhao.

Warlick has a couple of points worth pondering today:  First, has the technology train left the station, and so it’s no longer acceptable for teachers to use old tools?  He’s got a rant on trying to figure out if we’re teaching the “right stuff”:

I could have shared some of these new ideas with her, but it would not have helped.  The last time I helped my daughter prepare for a test, it was 8th grade and the unit test on the Civil War.  When she walked into that classroom, she could talk about and write about the reasons for the war, what the North and the South wanted to achieve, the advantages that the North held and those of the South, as well as their disadvantages.  She could tell you who won and who lost and why.

She made a 52 on the test because she couldn’t give the dates of the major battles of the war.

One of our mantras in the old Transportation Consulting Group at Ernst & Young was to understand that “You’re always ready to fight the last war.”  For what we were doing, generally we had to change the technology for each assignment.

That’s doubly true in education, in social studies, I think.  I constantly remind myself that my students don’t need the same things I got in high school.  We shouldn’t equip students to fight the last war, but instead prepare them to understand they need to get ready for the next one.

And what about your tags?  Warlick wonders. No answers, but good wonderings.

About these ads

5 Responses to Race to the Top: What’s a good job for a great bubble-guesser?

  1. [...] Race to the Top: What’s a good job for a great bubble-guesser? « Millard Fillmore’… [...]

    Like

  2. Ellie says:

    Ed asks: I included a picture — do I need to make it more clear, or was the Google search a good exercise?

    Google is always a good exercise and it was interesting reading various articles about bubbles and tests.

    The problem was not with your picture, but with my computer. I’m having some problems with images being blurred. I think I’m going to have to bite the bullet and take it to someone who actually knows what they’re doing.

    Like

  3. Ed Darrell says:

    Ellie: I included a picture — do I need to make it more clear, or was the Google search a good exercise?

    Elf Eye: “Make a PowerPoint” is a circle of hell all its own, for teachers. It’s a substitute for “write a report,” but generally easier to grade. It’s no substitute for learning, though. There is a lot of discussion about students who lack the initiative to do such an assignment without the whole thing being spelled out. It looks like a scavenger hunt; it’s less frustrating than given zeros on the due date, which is the usual spur for kids to ask about what they think they don’t understand. It’s a grade, but it isn’t education.

    Like

  4. Elf Eye says:

    Your example of the girl studying the Civil War reminds me of a PowerPoint on the Civil War that my daughter was assigned to complete. She was given a list of items to illustrate: list the names of Confederate Generals, list the names of Union Generals; list the items produced in the North, list the items produced in the South; reproduce stanzas from a song sung by Union soldiers, reproduce stanzas from a son sung by Confederate soldiers; list nicknames for a Union soldier, list nicknames for a Confederate soldier; and etc., etc. Basically, the whole exercise was a giant scavenger hunt for disjointed facts.

    Like

  5. Ellie says:

    I’ve learned something new today, which is supposed to be a good thing, isn’t it? Had to Google “Bubbling,” before I understood to what you were referring!

    Like

Play nice in the Bathtub -- splash no soap in anyone's eyes.

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 2,285 other followers

%d bloggers like this: