Flag fly dates

U.S. flag at Fort McHenry, near Baltimore, with fireworks - National Park Service photo

U.S. flag at Fort McHenry, near Baltimore, with fireworks – National Park Service photo

According to InfoPlease.com, the dates to fly the flag of the U.S.

When to Fly the Flag

The flag can be displayed on all days, but in particular it should be flown on:

  • New Year’s Day, January 1
  • Inauguration Day, January 20
  • Martin Luther King Jr.’s Birthday, third Monday in January
  • Lincoln’s Birthday, February 12
  • Washington’s Birthday, third Monday in February
  • Easter Sunday (variable)
  • Mother’s Day, second Sunday in May
  • Armed Forces Day, third Saturday in May
  • Memorial Day (half-staff until noon*), the last Monday in May
  • Flag Day, June 14
  • Independence Day, July 4
  • Labor Day, first Monday in September
  • Constitution Day, September 17
  • Columbus Day, second Monday in October
  • Navy Day, October 27
  • Veterans Day, November 11
  • Thanksgiving Day, fourth Thursday in November
  • Christmas Day, December 25
  • Other days as may be proclaimed by the President of the United States
  • The birthdays of States (date of admission)
  • State holidays

Though it’s not been added to the Flag Code, September 11 has been designated a national Patriot Day. Under the Edward M. Kennedy Serve America Act, Public Law 111-13, the president should issue a proclamation, and government entities should, and private citizens are encouraged, to fly flags at half staff. [Updated on September 11, 2013.]

See also 4 USC 1, sec. 6

*On Memorial Day, the flag should be hung at half-staff until noon, when it should be raised to the top of the staff.

The U.S. flag should be flown in each state on its statehood day, according to the flag code.  For the 50 U.S. states, the dates are listed below; the chart also tells the order of admission of each state.

Alabama Dec. 14, 1819
22 nd
Alaska Jan. 3, 1959
49 th
Arizona Feb. 14, 1912
48 th
Arkansas June 15, 1836
25 th
California Sept. 9, 1850
31 st
Colorado Aug. 1, 1876
38 th
Connecticut Jan. 9, 1788
5 th
Delaware Dec. 7, 1787
1 st
Florida March 3, 1845
27 th
Georgia Jan. 2, 1788
4 th
Hawaii Aug. 21, 1959
50 th
Idaho July 3, 1890
43 rd
Illinois Dec. 3, 1818
21 st
Indiana Dec. 11, 1816
19 th
Iowa Dec. 28, 1846
29 th
Kansas Jan. 29, 1861
34 th
Kentucky June 1, 1792
15 th
Louisiana April 30, 1812
18 th
Maine March 15, 1820
23 rd
Maryland April 28, 1788
7 th
Massachusetts Feb. 6, 1788
6 th
Michigan Jan. 26, 1837
26 th
Minnesota May 11, 1858
32 nd
Mississippi Dec. 10, 1817
20 th
Missouri Aug. 10, 1821
24 th
Montana Nov. 8, 1889
41 st
Nebraska March 1, 1867
37 th
Nevada Oct. 31, 1864
36 th
New Hampshire June 21, 1788
9 th
New Jersey Dec. 18, 1787
3 rd
New Mexico Jan. 6, 1912
47th
New York July 26, 1788
11 th
North Carolina Nov. 21, 1789
12 th
North Dakota Nov. 2, 1889
39 th or 40 th
Ohio March 1, 1803
17 th
Oklahoma Nov. 16, 1907
46 th
Oregon Feb. 14, 1859
33 rd
Pennsylvania Dec. 12, 1787
2 nd
Rhode Island May 29, 1790
13 th
South Carolina May 23, 1788
8 th
South Dakota Nov. 2, 1889
39 th or 40 th
Tennessee June 1, 1796
16 th
Texas Dec. 29, 1845
28 th
Utah Jan. 4, 1896
45 th
Vermont March 4, 1791
14 th
Virginia June 25, 1788
10 th
Washington Nov. 11, 1889
42 nd
West Virginia June 20, 1863
35 th
Wisconsin May 29, 1848
30 th
Wyoming July 10, 1890
44 th

How to fly the flag

Rules of flag etiquette are not many, but they have been subject to a lot of exaggeration over the years.  The U.S. Flag Code puts into law the general etiquette rules (there are no penalties for violating the rules).  Even the clear language of the statue confuses many.  The Library of Congress’s Congressional Research Service provides a good summary of the law; a publication of the U.S. Senate gives the law and pictorial examples of proper flag display.  Other groups, like the Boy Scouts of America, have separate publications.

Please consult one of these sources if you are not sure how to display the flag.

Resources, More, at Millard Fillmore’s Bathtub:

44 Responses to Flag fly dates

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  25. [...] U.S. law encourages Americans to fly the U.S. flag on holidays and a few other occasions. Congress set aside the third Monday in January as a holiday to commemorate the life of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. [...]

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  26. [...] U.S. law encourages Americans to fly the U.S. flag on holidays and a few other occasions. Congress set aside the third Monday in January as a holiday to commemorate the life of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. [...]

    Like

  27. [...] President’s Day is one of a score of dates Congress recognized in the Flag Code as appropriate for patriotic display of the U.S. flag. [...]

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  28. [...] President’s Day is one of a score of dates Congress recognized in the Flag Code as appropriate for patriotic display of the U.S. flag. [...]

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  29. The American Flag should be flown every day!!!

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  30. Lisa says:

    FLY YOUR FLAG EVERY DAY

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  31. [...] Flag fly dates [...]

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  32. [...] Flag flying on the National Day of Prayer? We’re coming up on four relatively under-appreciated flag-flying dates before Independence Day (July 4): [...]

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  33. [...] President’s Day is one of a score of dates Congress recognized in the Flag Code as appropriate for patriotic display of the U.S. flag. [...]

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  34. [...] President’s Day is one of a score of dates Congress recognized in the Flag Code as appropriate for patriotic display of the U.S. flag. [...]

    Like

  35. [...] U.S. law encourages Americans to fly the U.S. flag on holidays and a few other occasions. Congress set aside the third Monday in January as a holiday to commemorate the life of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. [...]

    Like

  36. [...] U.S. law encourages Americans to fly the U.S. flag on holidays and a few other occasions.  Congress set aside the third Monday in January as a holiday to commemorate the life of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. [...]

    Like

  37. Eddie says:

    We honored our nations heros on Patriot Day and we lowered our American Flag to half staff on September 11th. http://www.uncleflag.com/Patriot-day-s/513.htm

    Like

  38. [...] Forces Day is one of the score of dat&#101&#115&#32for which federal law suggests we fly our flags. &#32&#65&#114med Forces Day is the third Saturday in May, [...]

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  39. [...] Forces Day is one of the score of dates for which federal law suggests we fly our flags.  Armed Forces Day is the third Saturday in May, every [...]

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  40. [...] Fly your flag today for Presidents’ Day, one of the score of dates designated by Congress to fly the flag. [...]

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  41. [...] The law asks us to do it, but we only get the chance every four years. [...]

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  42. [...] Our flags get a double shot of exercise this week.  Flags fly on the third Monday of January in honor of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. [...]

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  43. [...] Thanksgiving is a national holiday, one of the 18 days designated by Congress as a “Fly the fl….  It’s been a historic year.  It’s a good day to fly the flag. [...]

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  44. [...] your U.S. flag today. This is one of the dates designated in law as a permanent date for flag flying. Miners and their children celebrate Labor Day, Littleton, Colorado, 1940 – Library of [...]

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